8
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      New genus and two new species of driftwood hoppers (Crustacea, Amphipoda, Talitridae) from northeast Atlantic and Mediterranean coastal regions

      Zoosystematics and Evolution

      Pensoft Publishers

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          A new specialist driftwood talitrid from the Swale, U.K., is figured and described as Neotenorchestia kenwildishi gen. n., sp. n. A further new driftwood talitrid, Macarorchestia pavesiae sp. n., is figured and described from coastal regions in the Adriatic Sea. Orchestia microphtalma Amanieu & Salvat, 1963 from the Atlantic coast of France is re-designated as Macarorchestia microphtalma (Amanieu & Salvat, 1963). A key is provided for the known species of driftwood talitrids in northeastern Atlantic and Mediterranean coastal regions.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 14

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          DNA barcoding of marine crustaceans from the Estuary and Gulf of St Lawrence: a regional-scale approach.

          Marine crustaceans are known as a group with a high level of morphological and ecological diversity but are difficult to identify by traditional approaches and usually require the help of highly trained taxonomists. A faster identification method, DNA barcoding, was found to be an effective tool for species identification in many metazoan groups including some crustaceans. Here we expand the DNA barcode database with a case study involving 80 malacostracan species from the Estuary and Gulf of St Lawrence. DNA sequences for 460 specimens grouped into clusters corresponding to known morphological species in 95% of cases. Genetic distances between species were on average 25 times higher than within species. Intraspecific divergence was high (3.78-13.6%) in specimens belonging to four morphological species, suggesting the occurrence of cryptic species. Moreover, we detected the presence of an invasive amphipod species in the St Lawrence Estuary. This study reconfirms the usefulness of DNA barcoding for the identification of marine crustaceans. © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Substituting time-consuming pencil drawings in arthropod taxonomy using stacks of digital photographs

            The most time-consuming part of a taxonomic description is making the illustrations. This contribution shows how to save time by omitting the pencil drawings of arthropod appendages and replacing them by stacks of microphotographs. These are imported into a drawing software package on a computer in order to make a publication-ready line drawing, a technique described in detail in Coleman (2003). The photographic method requires a special treatment of the appendages which is also shown.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Under the volcano: phylogeography and evolution of the cave-dwelling Palmorchestia hypogaea (Amphipoda, Crustacea) at La Palma (Canary Islands)

              Background The amphipod crustacean Palmorchestia hypogaea occurs only in La Palma (Canary Islands) and is one of the few terrestrial amphipods in the world that have adapted to a strictly troglobitic life in volcanic cave habitats. A surface-dwelling closely related species (Palmorchestia epigaea) lives in the humid laurel forest on the same island. Previous studies have suggested that an ancestral littoral Orchestia species colonized the humid forests of La Palma and that subsequent drought episodes in the Canaries reduced the distribution of P. epigaea favouring the colonization of lava tubes through an adaptive shift. This was followed by dispersal via the hypogean crevicular system. Results P. hypogaea and P. epigaea did not form reciprocally monophyletic mitochondrial DNA clades. They showed geographically highly structured and genetically divergent populations with current gene flow limited to geographically close surface locations. Coalescence times using Bayesian estimations assuming a non-correlated relaxed clock with a normal prior distribution of the age of La Palma, together with the lack of association of habitat type with ancestral and recent haplotypes, suggest that their adaptation to cave life is relatively ancient. Conclusion The data gathered here provide evidence for multiple invasions of the volcanic cave systems that have acted as refuges. A re-evaluation of the taxonomic status of the extant species of Palmorchestia is needed, as the division of the two species by habitat and ecology is unnatural. The information obtained here, and that from previous studies on hypogean fauna, shows the importance of factors such as the uncoupling of morphological and genetic evolution, the role of climatic change and regressive evolution as key processes in leading to subterranean biodiversity.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Zoosystematics and Evolution
                ZSE
                Pensoft Publishers
                1860-0743
                1435-1935
                October 10 2014
                October 10 2014
                : 90
                : 2
                : 133-146
                Article
                10.3897/zse.90.8410
                © 2014
                Product

                Comments

                Comment on this article