5
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Secondary Coats’ response to retinal vasculitis managed with bevacizumab

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          We report a case of 22-year-old young male who presented with a 3-month history of gradual and painless decrease of vision in his right eye (RE). On ophthalmological examination, best-corrected visual acuity in his RE was counting finger close to the face. Left eye ophthalmic examination was unremarkable. RE indirect ophthalmoscopy revealed multiple telangiectatic vessels, aneurysmal dilations, extensive yellow (lipid) exudation over the posterior pole along with perivascular exudation, and multiple sclerosed vessels in peripheral retina. Fluorescein angiography also revealed progressive leakage from telangiectasias, multiple aneurysmal outpouchings, extensive capillary dropouts, and vascular communicating channels in all quadrants. Spectral-domain-optical coherence tomography of macula demonstrated marked intraretinal fluid. Based on the above findings, a diagnosis of healed retinal vasculitis with Coats’-like response was made. The patient received 4-weekly two intravitreal bevacizumab injections which resulted in stabilization of the retinal findings and improvement in visual acuity.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 7

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: found
          Is Open Access

          Degree, duration, and causes of visual impairment in eyes affected with ocular tuberculosis

          Background Ocular tuberculosis (TB) can affect nearly every ocular tissue, leading to a variety of vision-threatening clinical manifestations. The goal of this study is to estimate the degree, duration, and causes of visual impairment in eyes affected by ocular TB. Results This was a retrospective study of patients diagnosed as ocular TB based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. We applied the World Health Organization definition of visual impairment (VI) to affected eye(s), instead of better-seeing eye. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) of <6/18 and ≥6/60 in the affected eye was classified as moderate VI and <6/60 and ≥3/60 as severe VI. Data collected included presenting and final BCVA of affected eyes and the worst BCVA during the study period. Sixty-one eyes of 40 patients were analyzed. Twenty-five patients (52.1%) had bilateral disease. The mean worst BCVA and mean final BCVA (logMAR) were 1.26 ± 0.87 and 0.61 ± 0.85, respectively, and their difference was highly significant (p < 0.0001, Friedman test). The median worst and final BCVA results were 1.30 (range 0.0 to 3.0) and 0.20 (range 0.0 to 3.0), respectively. The mean duration of follow-up was 98.34 ± 81.81 weeks. Moderate and severe VIs were seen in 14 (22.9%) and 12 (19.7%) eyes, respectively, during the course of follow up. Twenty eyes (32.8%) had BCVA of <3/60. Moderate VI or worse was most commonly seen in eyes with multifocal serpiginoid choroiditis (n = 6; 100%), retinal vasculitis (n = 25; 80.6%), and panuveitis (n = 12; 80%). The mean duration of visual loss was 25.2 ± 42.37 weeks (median 6.43 weeks, range 0 to 206.42 weeks). Vitreous hemorrhage, complicated cataract, and macular scarring were the common causes of VI. Conclusion Ocular TB can result in prolonged visual impairment, more commonly in patients with posterior uveitis or panuveitis.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: found
            Is Open Access

            Resolution of macular edema in Coats' disease with intravitreal bevacizumab

            A 13-year-old boy was referred because of visual deterioration in his right eye. The visual acuity was two meters of counting fingers. Indirect ophthalmoscopy and biomicroscopy revealed exudative macular edema as well as tumor-like telangiectatic vessels and exudation in temporal periphery. With diagnosis of Coats' disease (stage II) confirmed by fluorescein angiography, three intravitreal injections of bevacizumab were performed at 6-week intervals. One year after the last injection, there was a significant resolution of macular edema as well as visual acuity improvement to 20/20. This is the first case report in which a distinct improvement in macular edema was observed with intravitreal bevacizumab in Coats' disease.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: found
              Is Open Access

              Coats-like retinitis pigmentosa: Reports of three cases

              Purpose: Describing the ophthalmic findings of an exudative vasculopathy called as Coats-like retinitis pigmentosa on three patients. The etiology of the Coats-like retinitis pigmentosa is obscure. The principal theories have been discussed in this article. Methods: Three observational case series have been discussed. Complete ophthalmic examinations and color fundus photos, visual field, and fluorescein angiography have been performed. Results: We have identified 3 patients who have some typical clinical features of Coats-like retinitis pigmentosa; peripheral serous retinal detachment, telangiectasia, prominent lipid deposition, pigmentary changes in peripheral retina, and loss of vision. None of the three patients had positive family history. All of the patients have had symptoms of nyctalopia, decreased central vision, and two of them have had constriction of visual field. All of the patients have had cataracts and two of them underwent cataract surgery. Fundus examination and fluorescein angiography of patients revealed typical retinitis pigmentosa with Coats-type changes in bilateral inferiotemporal quadrants. Conclusion: A better understanding of clinical features and genetic etiology of Coats-type retinitis pigmentosa will aid diagnosis and development of new therapies. If sufficient conditions arise, genetic factors that influence the expression of CRB1 mutations in Coats-like retinitis pigmentosa should be detected.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Indian J Ophthalmol
                Indian J Ophthalmol
                IJO
                Indian Journal of Ophthalmology
                Medknow Publications & Media Pvt Ltd (India )
                0301-4738
                1998-3689
                September 2018
                : 66
                : 9
                : 1355-1357
                Affiliations
                Department of Vitreoretina, C L Gupta Eye Institute, Moradabad, Uttar Pradesh, India
                Author notes
                Correspondence to: Dr. Abhishek Varshney, Vitreo-Retina Services, C L Gupta Eye Institute, Ram Ganga Vihar, Phase 2 (Ext), Moradabad - 244 001, Uttar Pradesh, India. E-mail: doctorabhishekvarshney@ 123456gmail.com
                Article
                IJO-66-1355
                10.4103/ijo.IJO_279_18
                6113825
                30127171
                Copyright: © 2018 Indian Journal of Ophthalmology

                This is an open access journal, and articles are distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 License, which allows others to remix, tweak, and build upon the work non-commercially, as long as appropriate credit is given and the new creations are licensed under the identical terms.

                Categories
                Case Reports

                Comments

                Comment on this article