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      The Role of Uncertainty in Estimating Lead/Lag Relationships in Marine Sedimentary Archives: A Case Study From the Tropical Pacific : LEAD/LAG UNCERTAINTIES

      1 , 2 , 3 , 2 , 3 , 4
      Paleoceanography
      Wiley

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          Age dating and the orbital theory of the ice ages: Development of a high-resolution 0 to 300,000-year chronostratigraphy

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            Calibration of the alkenone paleotemperature index U37K′ based on core-tops from the eastern South Atlantic and the global ocean (60°N-60°S)

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              Global warming preceded by increasing carbon dioxide concentrations during the last deglaciation.

              The covariation of carbon dioxide (CO(2)) concentration and temperature in Antarctic ice-core records suggests a close link between CO(2) and climate during the Pleistocene ice ages. The role and relative importance of CO(2) in producing these climate changes remains unclear, however, in part because the ice-core deuterium record reflects local rather than global temperature. Here we construct a record of global surface temperature from 80 proxy records and show that temperature is correlated with and generally lags CO(2) during the last (that is, the most recent) deglaciation. Differences between the respective temperature changes of the Northern Hemisphere and Southern Hemisphere parallel variations in the strength of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation recorded in marine sediments. These observations, together with transient global climate model simulations, support the conclusion that an antiphased hemispheric temperature response to ocean circulation changes superimposed on globally in-phase warming driven by increasing CO(2) concentrations is an explanation for much of the temperature change at the end of the most recent ice age.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Paleoceanography
                Paleoceanography
                Wiley
                08838305
                November 2017
                November 2017
                November 23 2017
                : 32
                : 11
                : 1275-1290
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Earth Science; University of Southern California; Los Angeles CA USA
                [2 ]Department of Earth Science; University of California; Santa Barbara CA USA
                [3 ]Division of Applied Mathematics; Brown University; Providence RI USA
                [4 ]Department of Oceanography; Dalhousie University; Halifax Nova Scotia Canada
                Article
                10.1002/2016PA003057
                06aaf2a6-fc1f-4e2e-b649-ddaad4dbc592
                © 2017

                http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1

                http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/termsAndConditions#vor

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