Blog
About

25
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Aspirin Use, TumorPIK3CAMutation, and Colorectal-Cancer Survival

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Regular use of aspirin after a diagnosis of colon cancer has been associated with a superior clinical outcome. Experimental evidence suggests that inhibition of prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2) (also known as cyclooxygenase-2) by aspirin down-regulates phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling activity. We hypothesized that the effect of aspirin on survival and prognosis in patients with cancers characterized by mutated PIK3CA (the phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphonate 3-kinase, catalytic subunit alpha polypeptide gene) might differ from the effect among those with wild-type PIK3CA cancers. We obtained data on 964 patients with rectal or colon cancer from the Nurses' Health Study and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study, including data on aspirin use after diagnosis and the presence or absence of PIK3CA mutation. We used a Cox proportional-hazards model to compute the multivariate hazard ratio for death. We examined tumor markers, including PTGS2, phosphorylated AKT, KRAS, BRAF, microsatellite instability, CpG island methylator phenotype, and methylation of long interspersed nucleotide element 1. Among patients with mutated-PIK3CA colorectal cancers, regular use of aspirin after diagnosis was associated with superior colorectal cancer-specific survival (multivariate hazard ratio for cancer-related death, 0.18; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.06 to 0.61; P<0.001 by the log-rank test) and overall survival (multivariate hazard ratio for death from any cause, 0.54; 95% CI, 0.31 to 0.94; P=0.01 by the log-rank test). In contrast, among patients with wild-type PIK3CA, regular use of aspirin after diagnosis was not associated with colorectal cancer-specific survival (multivariate hazard ratio, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.69 to 1.32; P=0.76 by the log-rank test; P=0.009 for interaction between aspirin and PIK3CA variables) or overall survival (multivariate hazard ratio, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.75 to 1.17; P=0.96 by the log-rank test; P=0.07 for interaction). Regular use of aspirin after diagnosis was associated with longer survival among patients with mutated-PIK3CA colorectal cancer, but not among patients with wild-type PIK3CA cancer. The findings from this molecular pathological epidemiology study suggest that the PIK3CA mutation in colorectal cancer may serve as a predictive molecular biomarker for adjuvant aspirin therapy. (Funded by The National Institutes of Health and others.).

          Related collections

          Most cited references 40

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: found

          High frequency of mutations of the PIK3CA gene in human cancers.

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Effects of KRAS, BRAF, NRAS, and PIK3CA mutations on the efficacy of cetuximab plus chemotherapy in chemotherapy-refractory metastatic colorectal cancer: a retrospective consortium analysis.

            Following the discovery that mutant KRAS is associated with resistance to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibodies, the tumours of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer are now profiled for seven KRAS mutations before receiving cetuximab or panitumumab. However, most patients with KRAS wild-type tumours still do not respond. We studied the effect of other downstream mutations on the efficacy of cetuximab in, to our knowledge, the largest cohort to date of patients with chemotherapy-refractory metastatic colorectal cancer treated with cetuximab plus chemotherapy in the pre-KRAS selection era. 1022 tumour DNA samples (73 from fresh-frozen and 949 from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue) from patients treated with cetuximab between 2001 and 2008 were gathered from 11 centres in seven European countries. 773 primary tumour samples had sufficient quality DNA and were included in mutation frequency analyses; mass spectrometry genotyping of tumour samples for KRAS, BRAF, NRAS, and PIK3CA was done centrally. We analysed objective response, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival in molecularly defined subgroups of the 649 chemotherapy-refractory patients treated with cetuximab plus chemotherapy. 40.0% (299/747) of the tumours harboured a KRAS mutation, 14.5% (108/743) harboured a PIK3CA mutation (of which 68.5% [74/108] were located in exon 9 and 20.4% [22/108] in exon 20), 4.7% (36/761) harboured a BRAF mutation, and 2.6% (17/644) harboured an NRAS mutation. KRAS mutants did not derive benefit compared with wild types, with a response rate of 6.7% (17/253) versus 35.8% (126/352; odds ratio [OR] 0.13, 95% CI 0.07-0.22; p<0.0001), a median PFS of 12 weeks versus 24 weeks (hazard ratio [HR] 1.98, 1.66-2.36; p<0.0001), and a median overall survival of 32 weeks versus 50 weeks (1.75, 1.47-2.09; p<0.0001). In KRAS wild types, carriers of BRAF and NRAS mutations had a significantly lower response rate than did BRAF and NRAS wild types, with a response rate of 8.3% (2/24) in carriers of BRAF mutations versus 38.0% in BRAF wild types (124/326; OR 0.15, 95% CI 0.02-0.51; p=0.0012); and 7.7% (1/13) in carriers of NRAS mutations versus 38.1% in NRAS wild types (110/289; OR 0.14, 0.007-0.70; p=0.013). PIK3CA exon 9 mutations had no effect, whereas exon 20 mutations were associated with a worse outcome compared with wild types, with a response rate of 0.0% (0/9) versus 36.8% (121/329; OR 0.00, 0.00-0.89; p=0.029), a median PFS of 11.5 weeks versus 24 weeks (HR 2.52, 1.33-4.78; p=0.013), and a median overall survival of 34 weeks versus 51 weeks (3.29, 1.60-6.74; p=0.0057). Multivariate analysis and conditional inference trees confirmed that, if KRAS is not mutated, assessing BRAF, NRAS, and PIK3CA exon 20 mutations (in that order) gives additional information about outcome. Objective response rates in our series were 24.4% in the unselected population, 36.3% in the KRAS wild-type selected population, and 41.2% in the KRAS, BRAF, NRAS, and PIK3CA exon 20 wild-type population. While confirming the negative effect of KRAS mutations on outcome after cetuximab, we show that BRAF, NRAS, and PIK3CA exon 20 mutations are significantly associated with a low response rate. Objective response rates could be improved by additional genotyping of BRAF, NRAS, and PIK3CA exon 20 mutations in a KRAS wild-type population. Belgian Federation against Cancer (Stichting tegen Kanker). 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              CpG island methylator phenotype underlies sporadic microsatellite instability and is tightly associated with BRAF mutation in colorectal cancer.

              Aberrant DNA methylation of CpG islands has been widely observed in human colorectal tumors and is associated with gene silencing when it occurs in promoter areas. A subset of colorectal tumors has an exceptionally high frequency of methylation of some CpG islands, leading to the suggestion of a distinct trait referred to as 'CpG island methylator phenotype', or 'CIMP'. However, the existence of CIMP has been challenged. To resolve this continuing controversy, we conducted a systematic, stepwise screen of 195 CpG island methylation markers using MethyLight technology, involving 295 primary human colorectal tumors and 16,785 separate quantitative analyses. We found that CIMP-positive (CIMP+) tumors convincingly represent a distinct subset, encompassing almost all cases of tumors with BRAF mutation (odds ratio = 203). Sporadic cases of mismatch repair deficiency occur almost exclusively as a consequence of CIMP-associated methylation of MLH1 . We propose a robust new marker panel to classify CIMP+ tumors.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                New England Journal of Medicine
                N Engl J Med
                Massachusetts Medical Society
                0028-4793
                1533-4406
                October 25 2012
                October 25 2012
                : 367
                : 17
                : 1596-1606
                Article
                10.1056/NEJMoa1207756
                3532946
                23094721
                © 2012
                Product

                Comments

                Comment on this article