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      Rescaling low‐carbon transformations: Towards a relational ontology

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          Abstract

          Scale is an emergent theme in current scientific and policy debates on low‐carbon urban transformations. Yet notions of scale employed in such contexts are typically based on linear and hierarchical ontologies, and miss out on the long‐standing development of more nuanced conceptions of scale within Human Geography. This paper aims to advance a relational understanding of scale in the analysis and evaluation of low‐carbon urban initiatives ( LCUIs). We wish to lay the path towards an innately geographical conceptualisation of low‐carbon urban transformations more generally, in which cities are not seen as rigid and passive physical containers for decarbonisation initiatives, but rather as key nodes within vibrant socio‐technical networks operating across multiple material sites. Using a case study of the transnational and translocal REACH (Reduce Energy use And Change Habits) project funded by the European Union as illustration, we argue that low‐carbon urban transformations are immanently constituted of three sets of relational processes across scale, involving (1) politicisation, (2) enrolment and (3) the hybridisation of human and material agencies.

          Abstract

          This paper aims to advance a relational understanding of scale in the analysis and evaluation of low‐carbon urban initiatives. We wish to lay the path towards an innately geographical conceptualisation of low‐carbon urban transformations more generally, in which cities are not seen as rigid and passive physical containers for decarbonisation initiatives, but rather as key nodes within vibrant socio‐technical networks operating across multiple material sites.

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          Most cited references 69

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          Human geography without scale

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            Spaces of dependence, spaces of engagement and the politics of scale, or: looking for local politics

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              Between Fixity and Motion: Accumulation, Territorial Organization and the Historical Geography of Spatial Scales

               Neil Brenner (1998)
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                stefan.bouzarovski@manchester.ac.uk
                Journal
                Trans Inst Br Geogr
                Trans Inst Br Geogr
                10.1111/(ISSN)1475-5661
                TRAN
                Transactions
                John Wiley and Sons Inc. (Hoboken )
                0020-2754
                1475-5661
                07 October 2018
                June 2019
                : 44
                : 2 ( doiID: 10.1111/tran.2019.44.issue-2 )
                : 256-269
                Affiliations
                [ 1 ] Department of Geography Manchester Urban Institute University of Manchester Manchester UK
                [ 2 ] Centre for Climate and Energy Transformation Department of Geography University of Bergen Bergen Norway
                Author notes
                [* ] Correspondence

                Stefan Bouzarovski

                Email: stefan.bouzarovski@ 123456manchester.ac.uk

                Article
                TRAN12275
                10.1111/tran.12275
                6563166
                The information, practices and views in this article are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG). © 2018 The Authors. Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Royal Geographical Society (with The Institute of British Geographers).

                This is an open access article under the terms of the http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

                Page count
                Figures: 0, Tables: 0, Pages: 14, Words: 10836
                Product
                Funding
                Funded by: Bergen Research Foundation
                Funded by: Academia Agreement between the University of Bergen and Equinor
                Funded by: COST Action
                Award ID: CA16232
                Funded by: European Research Council
                Award ID: 313478
                Categories
                Regular Paper
                Regular Papers
                Custom metadata
                2.0
                tran12275
                June 2019
                Converter:WILEY_ML3GV2_TO_NLMPMC version:5.6.4 mode:remove_FC converted:13.06.2019

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