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      Kinesiology taping reduces the pain of finger osteoarthritis: a pilot single-blinded two-group parallel randomized trial

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          Abstract

          Objectives

          Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common arthropathy of the hand, and current treatments carry risks of adverse events. Supportive (kinesiology) tape may be analgesic and provide functional improvement, with a low risk of adverse outcomes. We experimented with supportive tape for OA of the proximal interphalangeal joint (PIPJ) of the finger in this pilot randomized trial.

          Methods

          This two-group parallel randomized trial recruited adults with OA of the PIPJ of the finger. We excluded patients lacking capacity or the ability to safely apply the tape. Participants were randomized to receive kinesiology tape on the dorsum of the finger, blind to grouping. Pain was the primary outcome, which was recorded on a visual analog scale (VAS). Secondary outcomes were hand function and adverse reactions. Bootstrapped between-group analyses are reported.

          Results

          Ten patients were included and randomized and provided complete data. There was no significant difference in pain between the groups (mean difference of 0.4 VAS units [95% confidence interval {CI} –1.6, 0.7], p=0.4). Overall, the application of kinesiology tape reduced reported pain by 6% (mean reduction of 0.6 VAS units [95% CI 0, 1.2], p=0.04). Taping did not affect hand function or digital range of motion. There were difficulties in recruiting individuals owing to the lack of dedicated research staff.

          Conclusion

          Kinesiology taping may reduce the pain of OA in the finger; however, whether this is a true effect, placebo effect, Hawthorne phenomenon, or due to a statistical error (ie, type 1 error due to underpowering) is unclear. Hence, further trials are required.

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          Most cited references 22

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          Methods to improve recruitment to randomised controlled trials: Cochrane systematic review and meta-analysis

          This review is an abridged version of a Cochrane Review previously published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2010, Issue 4, Art. No.: MR000013 DOI: 10.1002/14651858.MR000013.pub5 (see www.thecochranelibrary.com for information). Cochrane Reviews are regularly updated as new evidence emerges and in response to feedback, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews should be consulted for the most recent version of the review. Objective To identify interventions designed to improve recruitment to randomised controlled trials, and to quantify their effect on trial participation. Design Systematic review. Data sources The Cochrane Methodology Review Group Specialised Register in the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, ERIC, Science Citation Index, Social Sciences Citation Index, C2-SPECTR, the National Research Register and PubMed. Most searches were undertaken up to 2010; no language restrictions were applied. Study selection Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials, including those recruiting to hypothetical studies. Studies on retention strategies, examining ways to increase questionnaire response or evaluating the use of incentives for clinicians were excluded. The study population included any potential trial participant (eg, patient, clinician and member of the public), or individual or group of individuals responsible for trial recruitment (eg, clinicians, researchers and recruitment sites). Two authors independently screened identified studies for eligibility. Results 45 trials with over 43 000 participants were included. Some interventions were effective in increasing recruitment: telephone reminders to non-respondents (risk ratio (RR) 1.66, 95% CI 1.03 to 2.46; two studies, 1058 participants), use of opt-out rather than opt-in procedures for contacting potential participants (RR 1.39, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.84; one study, 152 participants) and open designs where participants know which treatment they are receiving in the trial (RR 1.22, 95% CI 1.09 to 1.36; two studies, 4833 participants). However, the effect of many other strategies is less clear, including the use of video to provide trial information and interventions aimed at recruiters. Conclusions There are promising strategies for increasing recruitment to trials, but some methods, such as open-trial designs and opt-out strategies, must be considered carefully as their use may also present methodological or ethical challenges. Questions remain as to the applicability of results originating from hypothetical trials, including those relating to the use of monetary incentives, and there is a clear knowledge gap with regard to effective strategies aimed at recruiters.
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            Interventions to improve recruitment and retention in clinical trials: a survey and workshop to assess current practice and future priorities

            Background Despite significant investment in infrastructure many trials continue to face challenges in recruitment and retention. We argue that insufficient focus has been placed on the development and testing of recruitment and retention interventions. Methods In this current paper, we summarize existing reviews about interventions to improve recruitment and retention. We report survey data from Clinical Trials Units in the United Kingdom to indicate the range of interventions used by these units to encourage recruitment and retention. We present the views of participants in a recent workshop and a priority list of recruitment interventions for evaluation (determined by voting among workshop participants). We also discuss wider issues concerning the testing of recruitment interventions. Results Methods used to encourage recruitment and retention were categorized as: patient contact, patient convenience, support for recruiters, monitoring and systems, incentives, design, resources, and human factors. Interventions felt to merit investigation by respondents fell into three categories: training site staff, communication with patients, and incentives. Conclusions Significant resources continue to be invested into clinical trials and other high quality studies, but recruitment remains a significant challenge. Adoption of innovative methods to develop, test, and implement recruitment interventions are required. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/1745-6215-15-399) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
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              Prevalence of symptomatic hand osteoarthritis and its impact on functional status among the elderly: The Framingham Study.

              Osteoarthritis is one of the most common joint disorders in the elderly, yet few studies have targeted symptomatic osteoarthritis, especially symptomatic hand osteoarthritis. The authors conducted a survey in 1992-1993 among an elderly population to estimate the prevalence of symptomatic hand osteoarthritis and to assess its impact on grip strength and functional activities. Framingham Study subjects received hand radiographs and answered queries on joint symptoms. Functional activities were assessed using an interviewer-administered questionnaire. Grip strength and observed functional performance were evaluated using standard procedures. A hand joint was defined as having symptomatic osteoarthritis if both symptoms and radiographic evidence of osteoarthritis were present. Of 1,041 subjects aged 71-100 years (36% men), the prevalence of symptomatic hand osteoarthritis was higher in women (26.2%) than in men (13.4%). Compared with those without symptomatic hand osteoarthritis, subjects with the disease had 10% reduced maximal grip strength, reported more difficulty writing, handling, or fingering small objects (odds ratio = 3.4), and showed more self-reported and observed difficulty carrying a 10-pound (4.5-kg) bundle (odds ratio = 1.7 and 1.6, respectively). In conclusion, in the context of a remarkable paucity of data on the epidemiology of symptomatic hand osteoarthritis, this study suggests that symptomatic hand osteoarthritis is a common disease among elders and frequently impairs hand function.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                J Pain Res
                J Pain Res
                Journal of Pain Research
                Journal of Pain Research
                Dove Medical Press
                1178-7090
                2018
                03 July 2018
                : 11
                : 1281-1288
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Leeds Teaching Hospitals Trust, Leeds, UK, ryckiewade@ 123456gmail.com
                [2 ]Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK, ryckiewade@ 123456gmail.com
                [3 ]Department of Hand Therapy, Pinderfields General Hospital, Wakefield, UK
                [4 ]Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Pinderfields General Hospital, Wakefield, UK
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Ryckie G Wade, Academic Plastic Surgery Office, Room, 004, Clarendon Wing D-Floor, Leeds, General Infirmary, Leeds LS1 3EX, UK, Email ryckiewade@ 123456gmail.com
                Article
                jpr-11-1281
                10.2147/JPR.S153071
                6037144
                © 2018 Wade et al. This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited

                The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed.

                Categories
                Clinical Trial Report

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