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      Exploring the protein-protein interaction landscape in plants : Protein-protein interaction landscape in plants

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          MaxQuant enables high peptide identification rates, individualized p.p.b.-range mass accuracies and proteome-wide protein quantification.

          Efficient analysis of very large amounts of raw data for peptide identification and protein quantification is a principal challenge in mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics. Here we describe MaxQuant, an integrated suite of algorithms specifically developed for high-resolution, quantitative MS data. Using correlation analysis and graph theory, MaxQuant detects peaks, isotope clusters and stable amino acid isotope-labeled (SILAC) peptide pairs as three-dimensional objects in m/z, elution time and signal intensity space. By integrating multiple mass measurements and correcting for linear and nonlinear mass offsets, we achieve mass accuracy in the p.p.b. range, a sixfold increase over standard techniques. We increase the proportion of identified fragmentation spectra to 73% for SILAC peptide pairs via unambiguous assignment of isotope and missed-cleavage state and individual mass precision. MaxQuant automatically quantifies several hundred thousand peptides per SILAC-proteome experiment and allows statistically robust identification and quantification of >4,000 proteins in mammalian cell lysates.
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            Accurate Proteome-wide Label-free Quantification by Delayed Normalization and Maximal Peptide Ratio Extraction, Termed MaxLFQ *

            Protein quantification without isotopic labels has been a long-standing interest in the proteomics field. However, accurate and robust proteome-wide quantification with label-free approaches remains a challenge. We developed a new intensity determination and normalization procedure called MaxLFQ that is fully compatible with any peptide or protein separation prior to LC-MS analysis. Protein abundance profiles are assembled using the maximum possible information from MS signals, given that the presence of quantifiable peptides varies from sample to sample. For a benchmark dataset with two proteomes mixed at known ratios, we accurately detected the mixing ratio over the entire protein expression range, with greater precision for abundant proteins. The significance of individual label-free quantifications was obtained via a t test approach. For a second benchmark dataset, we accurately quantify fold changes over several orders of magnitude, a task that is challenging with label-based methods. MaxLFQ is a generic label-free quantification technology that is readily applicable to many biological questions; it is compatible with standard statistical analysis workflows, and it has been validated in many and diverse biological projects. Our algorithms can handle very large experiments of 500+ samples in a manageable computing time. It is implemented in the freely available MaxQuant computational proteomics platform and works completely seamlessly at the click of a button.
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              A novel genetic system to detect protein-protein interactions.

              Protein-protein interactions between two proteins have generally been studied using biochemical techniques such as crosslinking, co-immunoprecipitation and co-fractionation by chromatography. We have generated a novel genetic system to study these interactions by taking advantage of the properties of the GAL4 protein of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This protein is a transcriptional activator required for the expression of genes encoding enzymes of galactose utilization. It consists of two separable and functionally essential domains: an N-terminal domain which binds to specific DNA sequences (UASG); and a C-terminal domain containing acidic regions, which is necessary to activate transcription. We have generated a system of two hybrid proteins containing parts of GAL4: the GAL4 DNA-binding domain fused to a protein 'X' and a GAL4 activating region fused to a protein 'Y'. If X and Y can form a protein-protein complex and reconstitute proximity of the GAL4 domains, transcription of a gene regulated by UASG occurs. We have tested this system using two yeast proteins that are known to interact--SNF1 and SNF4. High transcriptional activity is obtained only when both hybrids are present in a cell. This system may be applicable as a general method to identify proteins that interact with a known protein by the use of a simple galactose selection.
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                Author and article information

                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Plant Biotechnology and Bioinformatics; Ghent University; Ghent Belgium
                [2 ]Center for Plant Systems Biology; VIB; Ghent Belgium
                [3 ]Department of Biochemistry; Ghent University; Ghent Belgium
                [4 ]Center for Medical Biotechnology; VIB; Ghent Belgium
                [5 ]Plant Molecular Genetics Department, Centro Nacional de Biotecnología (CSIC); Campus Universidad Autónoma de Madrid; Madrid Spain
                Journal
                Plant, Cell & Environment
                Plant Cell Environ
                Wiley
                01407791
                February 2019
                February 2019
                October 03 2018
                : 42
                : 2
                : 387-409
                10.1111/pce.13433
                © 2018

                http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1

                http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/termsAndConditions#vor

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