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      Iron Deficiency in Heart Failure

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      Cardiology

      S. Karger AG

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          Most cited references 17

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          HFSA 2010 Comprehensive Heart Failure Practice Guideline.

          Heart failure (HF) is a syndrome characterized by high mortality, frequent hospitalization, reduced quality of life, and a complex therapeutic regimen. Knowledge about HF is accumulating so rapidly that individual clinicians may be unable to readily and adequately synthesize new information into effective strategies of care for patients with this syndrome. Trial data, though valuable, often do not give direction for individual patient management. These characteristics make HF an ideal candidate for practice guidelines. The 2010 Heart Failure Society of America comprehensive practice guideline addresses the full range of evaluation, care, and management of patients with HF. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.
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            Effect of intravenous iron sucrose on exercise tolerance in anemic and nonanemic patients with symptomatic chronic heart failure and iron deficiency FERRIC-HF: a randomized, controlled, observer-blinded trial.

            We tested the hypothesis that intravenous iron improves exercise tolerance in anemic and nonanemic patients with symptomatic chronic heart failure (CHF) and iron deficiency. Anemia is common in heart failure. Iron metabolism is disturbed, and administration of iron might improve both symptoms and exercise tolerance. We randomized 35 patients with CHF (age 64 +/- 13 years, peak oxygen consumption [pVO2] 14.0 +/- 2.7 ml/kg/min) to 16 weeks of intravenous iron (200 mg weekly until ferritin >500 ng/ml, 200 mg monthly thereafter) or no treatment in a 2:1 ratio. Ferritin was required to be <100 ng/ml or ferritin 100 to 300 ng/ml with transferrin saturation <20%. Patients were stratified according to hemoglobin levels (<12.5 g/dl [anemic group] vs. 12.5 to 14.5 g/dl [nonanemic group]). The observer-blinded primary end point was the change in absolute pVO2. The difference (95% confidence interval [CI]) in the mean changes from baseline to end of study between the iron and control groups was 273 (151 to 396) ng/ml for ferritin (p < 0.0001), 0.1 (-0.8 to 0.9) g/dl for hemoglobin (p = 0.9), 96 (-12 to 205) ml/min for absolute pVO2 (p = 0.08), 2.2 (0.5 to 4.0) ml/kg/min for pVO2/kg (p = 0.01), 60 (-6 to 126) s for treadmill exercise duration (p = 0.08), -0.6 (-0.9 to -0.2) for New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class (p = 0.007), and 1.7 (0.7 to 2.6) for patient global assessment (p = 0.002). In anemic patients (n = 18), the difference (95% CI) was 204 (31 to 378) ml/min for absolute pVO2 (p = 0.02), and 3.9 (1.1 to 6.8) ml/kg/min for pVO2/kg (p = 0.01). In nonanemic patients, NYHA functional class improved (p = 0.06). Adverse events were similar. Intravenous iron loading improved exercise capacity and symptoms in patients with CHF and evidence of abnormal iron metabolism. Benefits were more evident in anemic patients. (Effect of Intravenous Ferrous Sucrose on Exercise Capacity in Chronic Heart Failure; http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct/show/NCT00125996; NCT00125996).
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              Treatment of anemia with darbepoetin alfa in systolic heart failure.

              Patients with systolic heart failure and anemia have worse symptoms, functional capacity, and outcomes than those without anemia. We evaluated the effects of darbepoetin alfa on clinical outcomes in patients with systolic heart failure and anemia. In this randomized, double-blind trial, we assigned 2278 patients with systolic heart failure and mild-to-moderate anemia (hemoglobin level, 9.0 to 12.0 g per deciliter) to receive either darbepoetin alfa (to achieve a hemoglobin target of 13 g per deciliter) or placebo. The primary outcome was a composite of death from any cause or hospitalization for worsening heart failure. The primary outcome occurred in 576 of 1136 patients (50.7%) in the darbepoetin alfa group and 565 of 1142 patients (49.5%) in the placebo group (hazard ratio in the darbepoetin alfa group, 1.01; 95% confidence interval, 0.90 to 1.13; P=0.87). There was no significant between-group difference in any of the secondary outcomes. The neutral effect of darbepoetin alfa was consistent across all prespecified subgroups. Fatal or nonfatal stroke occurred in 42 patients (3.7%) in the darbepoetin alfa group and 31 patients (2.7%) in the placebo group (P=0.23). Thromboembolic adverse events were reported in 153 patients (13.5%) in the darbepoetin alfa group and 114 patients (10.0%) in the placebo group (P=0.01). Cancer-related adverse events were similar in the two study groups. Treatment with darbepoetin alfa did not improve clinical outcomes in patients with systolic heart failure and mild-to-moderate anemia. Our findings do not support the use of darbepoetin alfa in these patients. (Funded by Amgen; RED-HF ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00358215.).
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                CRD
                Cardiology
                10.1159/issn.0008-6312
                Cardiology
                S. Karger AG
                0008-6312
                1421-9751
                2014
                July 2014
                07 June 2014
                : 128
                : 4
                : 317-319
                Affiliations
                Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, Minn., USA
                Author notes
                *Inder Anand, MD, FRCP, D Phil (Oxon.), University of Minnesota Medical School, VA Medical Center 111C, Minneapolis, MN 55417 (USA), E-Mail anand001@umn.edu
                Article
                361040 Cardiology 2014;128:317-319
                10.1159/000361040
                24923867
                © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel

                Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

                Page count
                Pages: 3
                Categories
                Editorial Comment

                General medicine, Neurology, Cardiovascular Medicine, Internal medicine, Nephrology

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