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      Reduction in Platelet Activation by Citrate Anticoagulation Does Not Prevent Intradialytic Hemodynamic Instability

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          Abstract

          Background: The etiology of intradialytic hemodynamic instability is multifactorial. Of the various factors involved, a rise in core temperature seems to be crucial. In this respect, the bioincompatibility of hemodialysis (HD) treatment might play an important role. The application of cool dialysate reduces the number of periods of intradialytic hypotension (IDH) considerably. In rats, roller pump perfusion caused hypotension by shear stress induced platelet aggregation and subsequent serotonin release. During clinical HD, citrate anticoagulation abolished platelet activation almost completely. Hence, citrate anticoagulation might reduce IDH, whereas the beneficial effect of cool dialysate might be partly explained by reduced platelet activation. Methods: In the present study, blood pressure, IDH episodes, platelet activation, platelet aggregation, and serotonin release were studied crossover in 10 patients during HD with dalteparin anticoagulation at normal and low dialysate temperatures and during HD with citrate. Results: Citrate strongly reduced platelet activation, but did not improve IDH. The blood pressure was best preserved during cool-temperature HD, despite manifest platelet activation. Platelet activation was not accompanied by a rise in the plasma serotonin concentration. Conclusions: Three major conclusions can be drawn: (1) it is unlikely that platelet activation and subsequent serotonin release underlie IDH in the clinical situation; (2) the protective effects of cool dialysate on IDH appear to be independent of HD-induced platelet activation, and (3) extrapolating results from rat experiments to the human situation requires uppermost prudence.

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          Most cited references 17

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          Hemodialysis-associated hypotension as an independent risk factor for two-year mortality in hemodialysis patients.

          The relationship between blood pressure (BP) and mortality in hemodialysis patients has remained controversial. Some studies suggested that a lower pre- or postdialysis BP was associated with excess mortality, while others showed poorer outcome in patients with uncontrolled hypertension. We conducted a multicenter prospective cohort study to evaluate the impact of hemodialysis-associated hypotension on mortality. We recruited 1244 patients (685 males; mean age, 60 +/- 13 years) who underwent hemodialysis in 28 units during the two-year study period beginning in December 1999. Pre-, intra-, and postdialysis BP, and BP upon standing soon after hemodialysis, were measured in all patients at entry. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess the effect on mortality of pre-, intra-, and postdialysis BP, a fall in BP during hemodialysis, and a fall in BP upon standing soon after hemodialysis. During the study period, 149 patients died. Logistic models identified the lowest intradialysis systolic blood pressure (SBP) and degree of fall in SBP upon standing soon after hemodialysis as significant factors affecting mortality, but not pre- or postdialysis SBP and diastolic BP. The adjusted odds ratio for death was 0.79 (95% CI 0.64-0.98) when the lowest intradialysis SBP was analyzed in increments of 20 mm Hg, and was 0.82 (95% CI 0.67-0.98) when the fall in SBP upon standing soon after hemodialysis was analyzed in increments of 10 mm Hg. These results suggest that intradialysis hypotension and orthostatic hypotension after hemodialysis are significant and independent factors affecting mortality in hemodialysis patients.
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            Pathophysiology of dialysis hypotension: an update.

             J Daugirdas (2001)
            Dialysis hypotension occurs because a large volume of blood water and solutes are removed over a short period of time, overwhelming normal compensatory mechanisms, including plasma refilling and reduction of venous capacity, due to reduction of pressure transmission to veins. In some patients, seemingly paradoxical and inappropriate reduction of sympathetic tone may occur, causing reduction of arteriolar resistance, increased transmission of pressure to veins, and corresponding increase in venous capacity. Increased sequestration of blood in veins under conditions of hypovolemia reduces cardiac filling, cardiac output, and, ultimately, blood pressure. Adenosine release due to tissue ischemia may participate in reducing norepinephrine release locally, and activation of the Bezold-Jarisch reflex, perhaps in patients with certain but as yet undefined cardiac pathology, may be responsible for sudden dialysis hypotension. Patients with diastolic dysfunction may be more sensitive to the effects of reduced cardiac filling. The ultimate solution is reducing the ultrafiltration rate by use of longer dialysis sessions, more frequent dialysis, or reduction in salt intake. Increasing dialysis solution sodium chloride levels helps maintain blood volume and refilling but ultimately increases thirst and interdialytic weight gain, with a possible adverse effect on hypertension. Blood volume monitoring with ultrafiltration or dialysis solution sodium feedback loops are promising new strategies. Maintaining tissue oxygenation via an adequate blood hemoglobin level seems to be important. Use of adenosine antagonists remains experimental. Given the importance of sympathetic withdrawal, the use of pharmacologic sympathetic agonists is theoretically an attractive therapeutic strategy.
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              Citrate anticoagulation abolishes degranulation of polymorphonuclear cells and platelets and reduces oxidative stress during haemodialysis.

              During haemodialysis (HD), polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) and platelets are activated and release various granule products, including myeloperoxidase (MPO) and platelet factor 4 (PF4). MPO triggers the generation of reactive oxygen species, leading to irreversible protein, carbohydrate and lipid modification. PF4 probably also contributes to oxidative stress. As previously shown, HD-induced PMN degranulation is almost completely abolished during citrate anticoagulation, most probably due to its calcium chelation ability. In the present study, apart from HD-induced PMN and platelet degranulation, oxidative stress was analysed during three modes of anticoagulation. Heparin, dalteparin and citrate (HDhep, HDdal and HDcit) were compared in a randomized, crossover fashion in eight chronic HD patients. Multiple blood samples were taken during the third HD session of each modality, from both the afferent and efferent line. Besides the degranulation markers MPO and PF4, various markers of oxidative stress were measured, including oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL), malondialdehyde (MDA) and carboxymethyllysine (CML). During HDhep and HDdal, marked degranulation was observed shortly after the start of HD. In contrast, during HDcit, PF4 and MPO levels remained unaltered, suggesting no release at all. After 1 week of HDcit, ox-LDL levels were markedly reduced [median 26% (3-65%), P=0.01], if compared with HDhep and HDdal. As regards MDA and CML, no differences were found. This study shows first, that HD-induced PMN and platelet degranulation are early, most probably calcium-dependent processes and, secondly, that the formation of ox-LDL is clearly dependent on the type of anticoagulant applied.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                NEC
                Nephron Clin Pract
                10.1159/issn.1660-2110
                Nephron Clinical Practice
                S. Karger AG
                1660-2110
                2007
                May 2007
                07 March 2007
                : 106
                : 1
                : c9-c16
                Affiliations
                Departments of aNephrology and bClinical Chemistry, Medical Center Alkmaar, Alkmaar, cDepartment of Nephrology and dLaboratory for Physiology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
                Article
                100496 Nephron Clin Pract 2007;106:c9–c16
                10.1159/000100496
                17347579
                © 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel

                Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

                Page count
                Figures: 6, Tables: 1, References: 20, Pages: 1
                Categories
                Original Paper

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