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      THE GREENING OF AFFORDABLE HOUSING THROUGH PUBLIC AND PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS: DEVELOPMENT OF A MODEL FOR GREEN AFFORDABLE HOUSING

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          Abstract

          The trend towards affordable, green housing highlights the need for a Green Affordable Housing (GAH) model that produces durable dwellings that are not significantly more expensive to build, cheaper to operate, healthier for their occupants, and more environmentally sound. The model should also reduce the risk of poverty for those with low and moderate incomes, be close to public transportation, and support a neighborhood that is healthy, walkable and connected to the broader community and natural environment. This case study utilized detailed interviews with occupants, town officials, a developer, and a design builder to explore how green building strategies could be applied in real-world communities with the help of a Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and contributions from other funding bodies. Focusing on the Roanoke and Lee Street housing project in Blacksburg, Virginia (VA), this study demonstrated how green building strategies can be integrated into affordable housing with help from public programs and incentives to provide houses that are more durable, no more expensive to build, cheaper to operate, healthier, more environmentally sound and less risky for their occupants. The new framework includes ways to deal with neighborhood issues such as the deterioration of housing stock and infrastructure to support the creation of a vital and healthy neighborhood with improved public services and community spirit, as well as providing an integrated design process framework that enables stakeholders to work together to achieve the goal of building green and affordable housing.

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          Most cited references17

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          GREEN CONSTRUCTION: CONTRACTOR EXPERIENCES, EXPECTATIONS, AND PERCEPTIONS

          As the benefits of green building continue to change the Architecture/Engineering/Construction industry and the number of green projects rises in the United States due to market changes, more construction firms are gaining experience with this new way of building and changing their expectations for new hires from degree-granting construction programs. This paper documents a baseline study of contractor experiences, expectations, and perceptions associated with green building conducted in Fall 2006. The study was based on detailed survey results from 87 different companies recruiting from three major university construction programs in the eastern United States (Auburn, Purdue, and Virginia Tech). The survey collected data regarding current experience levels and capabilities of companies with regard to green construction, corporate expectations of new hires in terms of green construction knowledge and skills, and respondent expectations and perceptions about the future of the industry with regard to green projects. The findings of this study support the growing importance of green building as a component of the whole construction market and provide a benchmark against which to measure future changes in the industry over time.
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            Sustainable housing applications and policies for low-income self-build and housing rehab

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              Financing affordable housing in the United States

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                jgrb
                Journal of Green Building
                College Publishing
                1552-6100
                1943-4618
                1943-4618
                Winter 2014
                : 9
                : 1
                : 93-112
                Author notes

                1Ph.D., LEED AP, Assistant Professor, Department of Construction Management, Western Carolina University, Email: yonghan77@ 123456gmail.com (Corresponding Author).

                2Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Email: ceyhwang@ 123456polyu.edu.hk

                3Ph.D., Professor, Department of Architectural Engineering, Andong National University, Email: leekh@ 123456andong.ac.kr

                4Ph.D., Manager, Technology Development Department, POSCO A&C Co., Ltd., Email: mhjeon@ 123456poscoanc.com (Corresponding Author).

                Article
                jgb.9.1.93
                10.3992/1943-4618-9.1.93
                0763a67d-4793-43ae-9162-17c354c068a6
                ©2014 by College Publishing. All rights reserved.

                Volumes 1-10 of JOGB are open access and do not require permission for use, though proper citation should be given. To view the licenses, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/

                History
                Page count
                Pages: 20
                Categories
                RESEARCH ARTICLES

                Urban design & Planning,Civil engineering,Environmental management, Policy & Planning,Architecture,Environmental engineering
                public and private partnership,integrated design process,green building,affordable housing

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