Blog
About

1,014
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Oxytocin increases trust in humans.

      1 , , , ,

      Nature

      Springer Nature

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Trust pervades human societies. Trust is indispensable in friendship, love, families and organizations, and plays a key role in economic exchange and politics. In the absence of trust among trading partners, market transactions break down. In the absence of trust in a country's institutions and leaders, political legitimacy breaks down. Much recent evidence indicates that trust contributes to economic, political and social success. Little is known, however, about the biological basis of trust among humans. Here we show that intranasal administration of oxytocin, a neuropeptide that plays a key role in social attachment and affiliation in non-human mammals, causes a substantial increase in trust among humans, thereby greatly increasing the benefits from social interactions. We also show that the effect of oxytocin on trust is not due to a general increase in the readiness to bear risks. On the contrary, oxytocin specifically affects an individual's willingness to accept social risks arising through interpersonal interactions. These results concur with animal research suggesting an essential role for oxytocin as a biological basis of prosocial approach behaviour.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 24

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          A Theory of Fairness, Competition, and Cooperation

           E. Fehr,  K. Schmidt (1999)
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Does Social Capital Have an Economic Payoff? A Cross-Country Investigation

             S. Knack,  P. Keefer (1997)
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Trust, Reciprocity, and Social History

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Nature
                Nature
                Springer Nature
                1476-4687
                0028-0836
                Jun 02 2005
                : 435
                : 7042
                Affiliations
                [1 ] University of Zurich, Institute for Empirical Research in Economics, Blumlisalpstrasse 10, CH-8006 Zurich, Switzerland.
                nature03701
                10.1038/nature03701
                15931222

                Comments

                Comment on this article