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      Nitrogen addition frequency and propagule pressure influence Solidago canadensis invasion into native plant community

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          ABSTRACT

          Introduction

          Propagule pressure (i.e., the number of propagules) has long been recognized to play an essential role in plant invasion. But it is not clear whether propagule pressure influences the invasion of exotic plants into native plant communities when different frequencies of nitrogen are added.

          Method

          We established an experiment with three plant communities that included native plant communities alone (four grasses, two legumes and two forbs) or native plant communities with one or five invasive plants, Solidago canadensis , under three frequencies of nitrogen addition (no addition or low or high addition with the same amount).

          Results

          High propagule pressure significantly enhanced the biomass and relative dominance index of S. canadensis . Moreover, high propagule pressure only decreased the total and aboveground biomass of the legumes. However, the competitive effect between S. canadensis and the native community and biomass of the whole native community varied according to different frequencies.

          Conclusion

          Overall, high propagule pressure encouraged invasion by S. canadensis , while alow nitrogen frequency was advantageous for the native community to resist invasion in this experiment. The results provide a scientific basis to manage and control the invasion of S. canadensis .

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          Most cited references63

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          Global analysis of nitrogen and phosphorus limitation of primary producers in freshwater, marine and terrestrial ecosystems.

          The cycles of the key nutrient elements nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) have been massively altered by anthropogenic activities. Thus, it is essential to understand how photosynthetic production across diverse ecosystems is, or is not, limited by N and P. Via a large-scale meta-analysis of experimental enrichments, we show that P limitation is equally strong across these major habitats and that N and P limitation are equivalent within both terrestrial and freshwater systems. Furthermore, simultaneous N and P enrichment produces strongly positive synergistic responses in all three environments. Thus, contrary to some prevailing paradigms, freshwater, marine and terrestrial ecosystems are surprisingly similar in terms of N and P limitation.
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            BIOTIC INVASIONS: CAUSES, EPIDEMIOLOGY, GLOBAL CONSEQUENCES, AND CONTROL

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              Fluctuating resources in plant communities: a general theory of invasibility

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                Ecosystem Health and Sustainability
                Ecosyst Health Sustain
                Informa UK Limited
                2096-4129
                2332-8878
                December 31 2022
                December 31 2022
                : 8
                : 1
                Affiliations
                [1 ]The Key Laboratory of Ecological Protection in the Yellow River Basin of National Forestry and Grassland Administration, School of Ecology and Nature Conservation, Beijing Forestry University, Beijing, province, China
                Article
                10.1080/20964129.2022.2052763
                078de21c-fa54-4461-a389-0bef7acf1bd7
                © 2022

                http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/

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