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      Plasma Prolactin Responses to Acute Changes in Central Blood Volume in Man

      ,

      Hormone Research in Paediatrics

      S. Karger AG

      Hypotension, Prolactin, Cardiopulmonary blood volume

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          Abstract

          The present study examined the relationship between plasma prolactin (PRL) and central blood volume (CBV) in man. 6 adult males lay in a lower body pressure box at a thermoneutral ambient temperature (27 °C) on three occasions. On each occasion a 70-min control period was followed by a 20-min exposure to a lower body pressure of either 0 mm Hg, -20 (lower body negative pressure; LBNP), or + 10 mm Hg (lower body positive pressure; LBPP), followed by a 60-min recovery period. Blood was drawn and urine collected at 30-min intervals. Blood pressure and heart rate were monitored at 30-min intervals during control and recovery periods and at 10-min intervals during lower body pressure exposure. Neither 0 mm Hg, LBNP, nor LBPP altered plasma osmolality, sodium, or potassium levels. Increasing CBV by LBPP increased systemic blood pressure (p < 0.01) but had no effect on heart rate, plasma PRL, or urine osmolality. LBNP, in contrast, increased heart rate (p < 0.05). Half of the subjects undergoing LBNP developed presyncopal symptoms, characteristic of a vasovagal reaction which includes precipitous hypotension. Subjects developing these symptoms tended to exhibit an increase in plasma PRL and an increase in urine osmolality. Asymptomatic subjects demonstrated no change in plasma PRL or urine osmolality. In addition, subjects exhibiting a PRL response to LBNP had a higher control period plasma PRL baseline (231%) than did asymptomatic subjects. These data suggest that while plasma PRL levels are not sensitive to nonhypotensive changes in CBV, they do respond to hypotensive decreases in CBV and/or its associated nausea. Furthermore, the elevated plasma PRL baseline in symptomatic subjects may indicate an increased susceptibility to a vasovagal response to LBNP.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          HRE
          Horm Res Paediatr
          10.1159/issn.1663-2818
          Hormone Research in Paediatrics
          S. Karger AG
          1663-2818
          1663-2826
          1983
          1983
          26 November 2008
          : 18
          : 4
          : 153-159
          Affiliations
          Physiology Section, Medical Sciences Program, Indiana University, Bloomington, Ind., USA
          Article
          179789 Horm Res 1983;18:153–159
          10.1159/000179789
          6642422
          © 1983 S. Karger AG, Basel

          Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

          Page count
          Pages: 7
          Categories
          Original Paper

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