Blog
About

44
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Anti-GD2 Antibody with GM-CSF, Interleukin-2, and Isotretinoin for Neuroblastoma

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Preclinical and preliminary clinical data indicate that ch14.18, a monoclonal antibody against the tumor-associated disialoganglioside GD2, has activity against neuroblastoma and that such activity is enhanced when ch14.18 is combined with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) or interleukin-2. We conducted a study to determine whether adding ch14.18, GM-CSF, and interleukin-2 to standard isotretinoin therapy after intensive multimodal therapy would improve outcomes in high-risk neuroblastoma. Patients with high-risk neuroblastoma who had a response to induction therapy and stem-cell transplantation were randomly assigned, in a 1:1 ratio, to receive standard therapy (six cycles of isotretinoin) or immunotherapy (six cycles of isotretinoin and five concomitant cycles of ch14.18 in combination with alternating GM-CSF and interleukin-2). Event-free survival and overall survival were compared between the immunotherapy group and the standard-therapy group, on an intention-to-treat basis. A total of 226 eligible patients were randomly assigned to a treatment group. In the immunotherapy group, a total of 52% of patients had pain of grade 3, 4, or 5, and 23% and 25% of patients had capillary leak syndrome and hypersensitivity reactions, respectively. With 61% of the number of expected events observed, the study met the criteria for early stopping owing to efficacy. The median duration of follow-up was 2.1 years. Immunotherapy was superior to standard therapy with regard to rates of event-free survival (66±5% vs. 46±5% at 2 years, P=0.01) and overall survival (86±4% vs. 75±5% at 2 years, P=0.02 without adjustment for interim analyses). Immunotherapy with ch14.18, GM-CSF, and interleukin-2 was associated with a significantly improved outcome as compared with standard therapy in patients with high-risk neuroblastoma. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and the Food and Drug Administration; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00026312.)

          Related collections

          Most cited references 28

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          Nonparametric Estimation from Incomplete Observations

           E. Kaplan,  Paul Meier (1958)
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Neuroblastoma.

            The clinical hallmark of neuroblastoma is heterogeneity, with the likelihood of cure varying widely according to age at diagnosis, extent of disease, and tumour biology. A subset of tumours will undergo spontaneous regression while others show relentless progression. Around half of all cases are currently classified as high-risk for disease relapse, with overall survival rates less than 40% despite intensive multimodal therapy. This Seminar focuses on recent advances in our understanding of the biology of this complex paediatric solid tumour. We outline plans for the development of a uniform International Neuroblastoma Risk Group (INRG) classification system, and summarise strategies for risk-based therapies. We also update readers on new discoveries related to the underlying molecular pathogenesis of this tumour, with special emphasis on advances that are translatable to the clinic. Finally, we discuss new approaches to treatment, including recently discovered molecular targets that might provide more effective treatment strategies with the potential for less toxicity.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Treatment of high-risk neuroblastoma with intensive chemotherapy, radiotherapy, autologous bone marrow transplantation, and 13-cis-retinoic acid. Children's Cancer Group.

              Children with high-risk neuroblastoma have a poor outcome. In this study, we assessed whether myeloablative therapy in conjunction with transplantation of autologous bone marrow improved event-free survival as compared with chemotherapy alone, and whether subsequent treatment with 13-cis-retinoic acid (isotretinoin) further improves event-free survival. All patients were treated with the same initial regimen of chemotherapy, and those without disease progression were then randomly assigned to receive continued treatment with myeloablative chemotherapy, total-body irradiation, and transplantation of autologous bone marrow purged of neuroblastoma cells or to receive three cycles of intensive chemotherapy alone. All patients who completed cytotoxic therapy without disease progression were then randomly assigned to receive no further therapy or treatment with 13-cis-retinoic acid for six months. The mean (+/-SE) event-free survival rate three years after the first randomization was significantly better among the 189 patients who were assigned to undergo transplantation than among the 190 patients assigned to receive continuation chemotherapy (34+/-4 percent vs. 22+/-4 percent, P=0.034). The event-free survival rate three years after the second randomization was significantly better among the 130 patients who were assigned to receive 13-cis-retinoic acid than among the 128 patients assigned to receive no further therapy (46+/-6 percent vs. 29+/-5 percent, P=0.027). Treatment with myeloablative therapy and autologous bone marrow transplantation improved event-free survival among children with high-risk neuroblastoma. In addition, treatment with 13-cis-retinoic acid was beneficial for patients without progressive disease when it was administered after chemotherapy or transplantation.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                New England Journal of Medicine
                N Engl J Med
                Massachusetts Medical Society
                0028-4793
                1533-4406
                September 30 2010
                September 30 2010
                : 363
                : 14
                : 1324-1334
                Article
                10.1056/NEJMoa0911123
                3086629
                20879881
                © 2010
                Product

                Comments

                Comment on this article