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      Mapping Natural Language Commands to Web Elements

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          Abstract

          The web provides a rich, open-domain environment with textual, structural, and spatial properties. We propose a new task for grounding language in this environment: given a natural language command (e.g., "click on the second article"), choose the correct element on the web page (e.g., a hyperlink or text box). We collected a dataset of over 50,000 commands that capture various phenomena such as functional references (e.g. "find who made this site"), relational reasoning (e.g. "article by john"), and visual reasoning (e.g. "top-most article"). We also implemented and analyzed three baseline models that capture different phenomena present in the dataset.

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          Deep visual-semantic alignments for generating image descriptions

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            POMDP-Based Statistical Spoken Dialog Systems: A Review

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              Predicting pragmatic reasoning in language games.

              One of the most astonishing features of human language is its capacity to convey information efficiently in context. Many theories provide informal accounts of communicative inference, yet there have been few successes in making precise, quantitative predictions about pragmatic reasoning. We examined judgments about simple referential communication games, modeling behavior in these games by assuming that speakers attempt to be informative and that listeners use Bayesian inference to recover speakers' intended referents. Our model provides a close, parameter-free fit to human judgments, suggesting that the use of information-theoretic tools to predict pragmatic reasoning may lead to more effective formal models of communication.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                28 August 2018
                Article
                1808.09132

                http://arxiv.org/licenses/nonexclusive-distrib/1.0/

                Custom metadata
                EMNLP 2018
                cs.CL

                Theoretical computer science

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