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      A new species of burrowing snake (Serpentes: Dipsadidae: Apostolepis) from the state of Mato Grosso, Central-West region of Brazil

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          Abstract

          During a faunal rescue conducted at a hydroelectric power station constructed in a Cerrado savanna area in the state of Mato Grosso, a sample of five small stripe-patterned individuals of snakes of the genus ApostolepisCope, 1862 document the existence of an undescribed species, which is named herein. The new species can be distinguished from its congeners by a combination of scale counts, number of maxillary teeth and color pattern. The new species is most similar to ApostolepisborelliiPeracca, 1904, A.lineataCope, 1887, A.nelsonjorgeiLema & Renner, 2004, A.nigroterminataBoulenger, 1896, A.serranaLema & Renner, 2006 and A.underwoodiLema & Campbell, 2017 in its coloration pattern. However, it is distinguished from these species by having a pair of triangular blotches covering portions of the third to sixth supralabials, a white nuchal collar, the shape of the fourth supralabial and the shape of the tip of tail, the number of supralabials in contact with parietals, the size of the anterior chinshields, the color pattern of the paraventral side, parietal and terminal scales, the width of dorsal stripes, and a distinct number of subcaudals. The new species occurs in areas within the Cerrado biome.

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          Most cited references 12

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          A Method for Preparing the Hemipenis of Preserved Snakes

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            Revision of Bolivian Apostolepis (Squamata: Colubridae)

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              Phylogenetic relationships of a new species of Apostolepis from Brazilian Cerrado with notes on the assimilis group (Serpentes: Colubridae: Xenodontinae: Elapomorphini)

              The assimilis species group is one of the several assemblages that can be distinguished within the genus Apostolepis. The group is characterized by a uniform red dorsal pattern, broad nucho-cervical collars, enlarged light snout blotch, dark ventral head, and entirely black terminal shield. A new species is here recognized as a member of the assimilis group and its phylogenetic relationships to A. assimilis and A. cearensis is inferred by means of cladistic analysis. Apostolepis ammodites sp. nov. can be easily diagnosed from all congeners by many autapomorphies and an exclusive combination of features. Comparative data are presented on scalation, coloration, dentition, osteology, and geographic distribution, with some notes on feeding and reproductive biology. The new species occurs through central Brazilian Cerrado, filling a gap between the areas occupied by A. assimilis and A. cearensis. Although superficially resembling A. assimilis, parsimony analysis based on morphological data indicates its phylogenetic relationships closest to A. cearensis. Systematic analysis shows that two recently described species, A. freitasi and A. tertulianobeui, must be relegated as junior synonymies of A. cearensis and A. assimilis, respectively.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Zoologia
                Zoologia
                Pensoft Publishers
                1984-4689
                June 07 2018
                June 07 2018
                : 35
                : 1-10
                Article
                10.3897/zoologia.35.e26742
                © 2018

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