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Short-Term Mobility and the Risk of HIV Infection among Married Couples in the Fishing Communities along Lake Victoria, Kenya

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      Abstract

      Objective

      Mobility has long been associated with high HIV prevalence. We sought to assess sex differences in the relationship between mobility and risk for HIV infection among married couples in the fishing communities.

      Methods

      We conducted 1090 gender-matched interviews and rapid HIV testing with 545 couples proportionally representing all the different sizes of the fish-landing beaches in Kisumu County. We contacted a random sample of fishermen as our index participants and asked them to enrol in the study together with their spouses. The consenting couples were separated into different private rooms for concurrent interviews and thereafter reunited for couple rapid HIV counselling and testing. In addition to socio-economic and behavioural data, we collected information on overnight travels and divided couples in 4 groups as follows both partners not mobile, both partners mobile, only woman mobile, and only man mobile. Other than descriptive statistics, we used X 2 and U tests to compare groups of variables and multivariate logistic regression to measure association between mobility and HIV infection.

      Results

      We found significant differences in the number of trips women travelled in the preceding month (mean 4.6, SD 7.1) compared to men (mean 3.3, SD 4.9; p<0.01) and when the women did travel, they were more likely to spend more days away from home than their male partners (mean 5.2 [SD 7.2] versus 3.4 SD 5.6; p = 0.01). With an HIV prevalence of 22.7% in women compared to 20.9% among men, mobile women who had non-mobile spouses had 2.1 times the likelihood of HIV infection compared to individuals in couples where both partners were non-mobile.

      Conclusion

      The mobility of fishermen’s spouses is associated with HIV infection that is not evident among fishermen themselves. Therefore, interventions in this community could be a combination of sex-specific programming that targets women and combined programming for couples.

      Related collections

      Most cited references 28

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      New heterosexually transmitted HIV infections in married or cohabiting couples in urban Zambia and Rwanda: an analysis of survey and clinical data.

      Sub-Saharan Africa has a high rate of HIV infection, most of which is attributable to heterosexual transmission. Few attempts have been made to assess the extent of HIV transmission within marriages, and HIV-prevention efforts remain focused on abstinence and non-marital sex. We aimed to estimate the proportion of heterosexual transmission of HIV which occurs within married or cohabiting couples in urban Zambia and Rwanda each year. We used population-based data from Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) on heterosexual behaviour in Zambia in 2001-02 and in Rwanda in 2005. We also used data on the HIV serostatus of married or cohabiting couples and non-cohabiting couples that was collected through a voluntary counselling and testing service for urban couples in Lusaka, in Zambia, and Kigali, in Rwanda. We estimated the probability that an individual would acquire an incident HIV infection from a cohabiting or non-cohabiting sexual partner, and then the proportion of total heterosexual HIV transmission which occurs within married or cohabiting couples in these settings each year. We analysed DHS data from 1739 Zambian women, 540 Zambian men, 1176 Rwandan women, and 606 Rwandan men. Under our base model, we estimated that 55.1% to 92.7% of new heterosexually acquired HIV infections among adults in urban Zambia and Rwanda occurred within serodiscordant marital or cohabiting relationships, depending on the sex of the index partner and on location. Under our extended model, which incorporated the higher rates of reported condom use that we found with non-cohabiting partners, we estimated that 60.3% to 94.2% of new heterosexually acquired infections occurred within marriage or cohabitation. We estimated that an intervention for couples which reduced transmission in serodiscordant urban cohabiting couples from 20% to 7% every year could avert 35.7% to 60.3% of heterosexually transmitted HIV infections that would otherwise occur. Since most heterosexual HIV transmission for both men and women in urban Zambia and Rwanda takes place within marriage or cohabitation, voluntary counselling and testing for couples should be promoted, as should other evidence-based interventions that target heterosexual couples.
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        Sexual double standards: a review and methodological critique of two decades of research.

        A review of 30 studies published since 1980 found evidence for the continued existence of sexual double standards: different standards of sexual permissiveness for women and men. Experimental studies have included predominantly White North American college students; ethnographies, focus group and interview studies, and linguistic analyses have included more diverse samples. Studies show that sexual double standards are influenced by situational and interpersonal factors (e.g., the target's age, level of relationship commitment, and number of partners), and that double standards are local constructions, differing across ethnic and cultural groups. This review discusses methodological issues, including the strengths and limitations of quantitative and qualitative approaches. It also discusses implications for women s high-risk sexual behavior and sexual identity, and suggests directions for future research.
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          HIV Prevalence and Associated Risk Factors among Individuals Aged 13-34 Years in Rural Western Kenya

          Objectives To estimate HIV prevalence and characterize risk factors among young adults in Asembo, rural western Kenya. Design Community-based cross-sectional survey. Methods From a demographic surveillance system, we selected a random sample of residents aged 13-34 years, who were contacted at home and invited to a nearby mobile study site. Consent procedures for non-emancipated minors required assent and parental consent. From October 2003 - April 2004, consenting participants were interviewed on risk behavior and tested for HIV and HSV-2. HIV voluntary counseling and testing was offered. Results Of 2606 eligible residents, 1822 (70%) enrolled. Primary reasons for refusal included not wanting blood taken, not wanting to learn HIV status, and partner/parental objection. Females comprised 53% of 1762 participants providing blood. Adjusted HIV prevalence was 15.4% overall: 20.5% among females and 10.2% among males. HIV prevalence was highest in women aged 25-29 years (36.5%) and men aged 30-34 years (41.1%). HSV-2 prevalence was 40.0% overall: 53% among females, 25.8% among males. In multivariate models stratified by gender and marital status, HIV infection was strongly associated with age, higher number of sex partners, widowhood, and HSV-2 seropositivity. Conclusions Asembo has extremely high HIV and HSV-2 prevalence, and probable high incidence, among young adults. Further research on circumstances around HIV acquisition in young women and novel prevention strategies (vaccines, microbicides, pre-exposure prophylaxis, HSV-2 prevention, etc.) are urgently needed.
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            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            [1 ]Center for Microbiology Research, Kenya Medical Research Institute, Kisumu, Kenya
            [2 ]Department of Obstetrics, Gynaecology and Reproductive Sciences, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States of America
            [3 ]Department of Geography, Kenyatta University, Nairobi, Kenya
            [4 ]Department of Public Health, Kenyatta University, Nairobi, Kenya
            University of Alabama at Birmingham, United States of America
            Author notes

            Competing Interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

            Conceived and designed the experiments: ZK CS IM EB. Analyzed the data: ZK. Wrote the paper: ZK CC.

            Contributors
            Role: Editor
            Journal
            PLoS One
            PLoS ONE
            plos
            plosone
            PLoS ONE
            Public Library of Science (San Francisco, USA )
            1932-6203
            2013
            15 January 2013
            : 8
            : 1
            23336005
            3545885
            PONE-D-12-27727
            10.1371/journal.pone.0054523
            (Editor)

            This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

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            Pages: 7
            Funding
            The study was funded by the Consortium for National Health Research (CNHR). The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.
            Categories
            Research Article
            Medicine
            Epidemiology
            Spatial Epidemiology
            Infectious Diseases
            Sexually Transmitted Diseases
            AIDS
            Viral Diseases
            HIV
            HIV epidemiology
            HIV prevention
            Obstetrics and Gynecology
            Genitourinary Infections
            HIV
            Public Health
            Behavioral and Social Aspects of Health
            Urology
            Genitourinary Infections
            HIV

            Uncategorized

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