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      eMouseAtlas informatics: embryo atlas and gene expression database

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      Mammalian Genome

      Springer US

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          Abstract

          A significant proportion of developmental biology data is presented in the form of images at morphologically diverse stages of development. The curation of these datasets presents different challenges to that of sequence/text-based data. Towards this end, the eMouseAtlas project created a digital atlas of mouse embryo development as a means of understanding developmental anatomy and exploring the relationship between genes and development in a spatial context. Using the morphological staging system pioneered by Karl Theiler, the project has generated 3D models of post-implantation mouse development and used them as a spatial framework for the delineation of anatomical components and for archiving in situ gene expression data in the EMAGE database. This has allowed us to develop a unique online resource for mouse developmental biology. We describe here the underlying structure of the resource, as well as some of the tools that have been developed to allow users to mine the curated image data. These tools include our IIP3D/X3DOM viewer that allows 3D visualisation of anatomy and/or gene expression in the context of a web browser, and the eHistology resource that extends this functionality to allow visualisation of high-resolution cellular level images of histology sections. Furthermore, we review some of the informatics aspects of eMouseAtlas to provide a deeper insight into the use of the atlas and gene expression database.

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          Most cited references 15

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          The atlas of mouse development

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            EMAP and EMAGE: a framework for understanding spatially organized data.

            The Edinburgh MouseAtlas Project (EMAP) is a time-series of mouse-embryo volumetric models. The models provide a context-free spatial framework onto which structural interpretations and experimental data can be mapped. This enables collation, comparison, and query of complex spatial patterns with respect to each other and with respect to known or hypothesized structure. The atlas also includes a time-dependent anatomical ontology and mapping between the ontology and the spatial models in the form of delineated anatomical regions or tissues. The models provide a natural, graphical context for browsing and visualizing complex data. The Edinburgh Mouse Atlas Gene-Expression Database (EMAGE) is one of the first applications of the EMAP framework and provides a spatially mapped gene-expression database with associated tools for data mapping, submission, and query. In this article, we describe the underlying principles of the Atlas and the gene-expression database, and provide a practical introduction to the use of the EMAP and EMAGE tools, including use of new techniques for whole body gene-expression data capture and mapping.
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              EMAGE mouse embryo spatial gene expression database: 2014 update

              EMAGE (http://www.emouseatlas.org/emage/) is a freely available database of in situ gene expression patterns that allows users to perform online queries of mouse developmental gene expression. EMAGE is unique in providing both text-based descriptions of gene expression plus spatial maps of gene expression patterns. This mapping allows spatial queries to be accomplished alongside more traditional text-based queries. Here, we describe our recent progress in spatial mapping and data integration. EMAGE has developed a method of spatially mapping 3D embryo images captured using optical projection tomography, and through the use of an IIP3D viewer allows users to view arbitrary sections of raw and mapped 3D image data in the context of a web browser. EMAGE now includes enhancer data, and we have spatially mapped images from a comprehensive screen of transgenic reporter mice that detail the expression of mouse non-coding genomic DNA fragments with enhancer activity. We have integrated the eMouseAtlas anatomical atlas and the EMAGE database so that a user of the atlas can query the EMAGE database easily. In addition, we have extended the atlas framework to enable EMAGE to spatially cross-index EMBRYS whole mount in situ hybridization data. We additionally report on recent developments to the EMAGE web interface, including new query and analysis capabilities.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Richard.Baldock@igmm.ed.ac.uk
                Journal
                Mamm Genome
                Mamm. Genome
                Mammalian Genome
                Springer US (New York )
                0938-8990
                1432-1777
                22 August 2015
                22 August 2015
                2015
                : 26
                : 9-10
                : 431-440
                Affiliations
                MRC Human Genetics Unit, IGMM, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland
                Article
                9596
                10.1007/s00335-015-9596-5
                4602050
                26296321
                © The Author(s) 2015

                Open AccessThis article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.

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                © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

                Genetics

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