Blog
About

8
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    5
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Is gender inequality in the domestic sphere associated with psychological distress among women and men? Results from the Northern Swedish Cohort.

      Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health

      standards, psychology, Work, Women's Health, epidemiology, Sweden, Stress, Psychological, Socioeconomic Factors, Social Perception, Schools, Questionnaires, Multivariate Analysis, Men's Health, Male, Longitudinal Studies, Interpersonal Relations, Humans, Housekeeping, Health Status Disparities, Health Behavior, Follow-Up Studies, Female, Cohort Studies, Career Choice, Adult

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          The aim of this study was to analyse whether gender inequality in the domestic sphere was associated with psychological distress among women and men. In a cohort study, all pupils in the last year of compulsory school in a middle-sized industrial town in northern Sweden were followed until the age of 42. For this study a sample of cohabiting participants (n=372 women, 352 men) was selected. Gender inequality was measured as perceptions of gender inequality in the couple relationship, time spent on household work, responsibility for domestic work and childcare, and was analysed in relation to psychological distress, after taking possible background variables as well as earlier health status into account. In the multivariate analyses, perception of gender inequality in the couple relationship was associated with psychological distress for both women (OR 2.23, CI 1.20 to 4.18) and men (OR 3.51, CI 1.69 to 7.31). For women only, taking whole responsibility for domestic work was associated with the outcome (OR 2.17, CI 1.05 to 4.48). For men, taking less than half of the responsibility for domestic work was associated with psychological distress (OR 2.25, CI 1.24 to 3.91). Gender inequality in the domestic sphere seems to be an important determinant of psychological distress for both women and men.

          Related collections

          Author and article information

          Journal
          20940171
          10.1136/jech.2010.109231

          Comments

          Comment on this article