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      The Politics of Emotion in Everyday Life: "Appropriate" Emotion and Claims on Identity.

      Review of General Psychology

      American Psychological Association (APA)

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          Most cited references 31

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          Facial expression and emotion.

           P Ekman (1993)
          Cross-cultural research on facial expression and the developments of methods to measure facial expression are briefly summarized. What has been learned about emotion from this work on the face is then elucidated. Four questions about facial expression and emotion are discussed: What information does an expression typically convey? Can there be emotion without facial expression? Can there be a facial expression of emotion without emotion? How do individuals differ in their facial expressions of emotion?
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            Lying in everyday life.

            In 2 diary studies of lying, 77 college students reported telling 2 lies a day, and 70 community members told 1. Participants told more self-centered lies than other-oriented lies, except in dyads involving only women, in which other-oriented lies were as common as self-centered ones. Participants told relatively more self-centered lies to men and relatively more other-oriented lies to women. Consistent with the view of lying as an everyday social interaction process, participants said that they did not regard their lies as serious and did not plan them much or worry about being caught. Still, social interactions in which lies were told were less pleasant and less intimate than those in which no lies were told.
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              The Emotional Side of Prejudice: The Attribution of Secondary Emotions to Ingroups and Outgroups

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Review of General Psychology
                Review of General Psychology
                American Psychological Association (APA)
                1089-2680
                2005
                2005
                : 9
                : 1
                : 3-15
                Article
                10.1037/1089-2680.9.1.3
                © 2005

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