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      Analysis of Genomic Sequence Data Reveals the Origin and Evolutionary Separation of Hawaiian Hoary Bat Populations

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          Abstract

          We examine the genetic history and population status of Hawaiian hoary bats ( Lasiurus semotus), the most isolated bats on Earth, and their relationship to northern hoary bats ( Lasiurus cinereus), through whole-genome analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphisms mapped to a de novo-assembled reference genome. Profiles of genomic diversity and divergence indicate that Hawaiian hoary bats are distinct from northern hoary bats, and form a monophyletic group, indicating a single ancestral colonization event 1.34 Ma, followed by substantial divergence between islands beginning 0.51 Ma. Phylogenetic analysis indicates Maui is central to the radiation across the archipelago, with the southward expansion to Hawai‘i and westward to O‘ahu and Kaua‘i. Because this endangered species is of conservation concern, a clearer understanding of the population genetic structure of this bat in the Hawaiian Islands is of timely importance.

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          Author and article information

          Contributors
          Role: Associate Editor
          Journal
          Genome Biol Evol
          Genome Biol Evol
          gbe
          Genome Biology and Evolution
          Oxford University Press
          1759-6653
          September 2020
          27 August 2020
          : 12
          : 9
          : 1504-1514
          Affiliations
          [e1 ] Hawai‘i Cooperative Studies Unit, University of Hawai‘i at Hilo
          [e2 ] Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine , Blacksburg, Virginia
          [e3 ] Department of Biomedical Sciences and Pathobiology, Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine , Blacksburg, Virginia
          [e4 ] Center for One Health Research, Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine , Blacksburg, Virginia
          [e5 ] Institute of Evolution, University of Haifa , Israel
          [e6 ] Research School of Biology, Australian National University, Acton , Australian Capital Territory, Australia
          [e7 ] School of Biology & Environmental Science, University College Dublin , Ireland
          [e8 ] Earth Institute, University College Dublin , Ireland
          [e9 ] School of Life Sciences, University of Nevada , Las Vegas
          [e10 ]U.S. Geological Survey, Pacific Island Ecosystems Research Center , Hawai‘i National Park, HI
          Author notes
          Corresponding author: E-mail: pmichalak@ 123456vcom.edu
          Article
          PMC7543519 PMC7543519 7543519 evaa137
          10.1093/gbe/evaa137
          7543519
          32853363
          Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution 2020.

          This work is written by a US Government employee and is in the public domain in the US.

          Page count
          Pages: 11
          Categories
          Research Article
          AcademicSubjects/SCI01130
          AcademicSubjects/SCI01140

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