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      The Biophysics of Infection.

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          Abstract

          Our understanding of the processes involved in infection has grown enormously in the past decade due in part to emerging methods of biophysics. This new insight has been enabled through advances in interdisciplinary experimental technologies and theoretical methods at the cutting-edge interface of the life and physical sciences. For example, this has involved several state-of-the-art biophysical tools used in conjunction with molecular and cell biology approaches, which enable investigation of infection in living cells. There are also new, emerging interfacial science tools which enable significant improvements to the resolution of quantitative measurements both in space and time. These include single-molecule biophysics methods and super-resolution microscopy approaches. These new technological tools in particular have underpinned much new understanding of dynamic processes of infection at a molecular length scale. Also, there are many valuable advances made recently in theoretical approaches of biophysics which enable advances in predictive modelling to generate new understanding of infection. Here, I discuss these advances, and take stock on our knowledge of the biophysics of infection and discuss where future advances may lead.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Adv. Exp. Med. Biol.
          Advances in experimental medicine and biology
          Springer Nature America, Inc
          0065-2598
          0065-2598
          2016
          : 915
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Department of Physics and Biology, Biological Physical Sciences Institute (BPSI), University of York, York, YO10 5DD, UK. mark.leake@york.ac.uk.
          Article
          10.1007/978-3-319-32189-9_1
          27193533
          0a57e6b7-a170-499c-ac8b-feb81b697fe5
          History

          Super-resolution,Single-molecule biophysics
          Super-resolution, Single-molecule biophysics

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