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      Influence of cultural contexts on the appreciation of different cultural ecosystem services based on social network analysis

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      One Ecosystem

      Pensoft Publishers

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          Abstract

          Since the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment, ecosystem science domain has made tremendous progress in the study of ecosystem services, but debates on neglected cultural ecosystem services (CES) have persisted. A recent approach established by the Intergovernmental Panel for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) identifies and advocates incorporation of the CES through the role of local knowledge across other ecosystem services. However, approaches and tools that enable engagement of CES are limited. In this study, we examine how cultural contexts influence the appreciation of different CES, by identifying the behavioural aspects and the indigenous knowledge that has evolved on the basis of Social Network Analysis (SNA). SNA measures the network of relations between people and groups developed traditionally for a long time and their relational values with natural resources and ecosystem services. Through a comprehensive literature review of scholarly research published in Scopus data base, this study explicitly illustrates the interrelationship between SNA and CES. Keywords associated with SNA and cultural ecosystem services including forests, fisheries and agriculture (farming) were used. It was found that various aspects of social network uphold relational values of cultural importance and enhance resilience in groups amidst the social changes and times as societies progress. For instance, in the case of homophily, actors who are attracted to one another chose to interact in their defined network (e.g. fishing network) forming a strong social capital. Consequently, they shared similar beliefs and values that were eventually handed to the next generation of the network which shaped their heritage and identity. Social learning networks in various communities were also found to play a key role in information exchange and knowledge sharing among members compared to information from foreign technical experts. To fully integrate CES into sustainable decision making, this review suggests incorporation of the analysis of social networks formed in different cultural contexts globally.

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          Most cited references 55

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          TAKING STOCK OF NETWORKS AND ORGANIZATIONS: A MULTILEVEL PERSPECTIVE.

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            Who's in and why? A typology of stakeholder analysis methods for natural resource management.

            Stakeholder analysis means many things to different people. Various methods and approaches have been developed in different fields for different purposes, leading to confusion over the concept and practice of stakeholder analysis. This paper asks how and why stakeholder analysis should be conducted for participatory natural resource management research. This is achieved by reviewing the development of stakeholder analysis in business management, development and natural resource management. The normative and instrumental theoretical basis for stakeholder analysis is discussed, and a stakeholder analysis typology is proposed. This consists of methods for: i) identifying stakeholders; ii) differentiating between and categorising stakeholders; and iii) investigating relationships between stakeholders. The range of methods that can be used to carry out each type of analysis is reviewed. These methods and approaches are then illustrated through a series of case studies funded through the Rural Economy and Land Use (RELU) programme. These case studies show the wide range of participatory and non-participatory methods that can be used, and discuss some of the challenges and limitations of existing methods for stakeholder analysis. The case studies also propose new tools and combinations of methods that can more effectively identify and categorise stakeholders and help understand their inter-relationships.
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              The Structure of Founding Teams: Homophily, Strong Ties, and Isolation among U.S. Entrepreneurs

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                One Ecosystem
                OE
                Pensoft Publishers
                2367-8194
                March 27 2019
                March 27 2019
                : 4
                Article
                10.3897/oneeco.4.e33368
                © 2019

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