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      A single injection of crystallizable fragment domain–modified antibodies elicits durable protection from SHIV infection

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          Abstract

          In the absence of an effective and safe vaccine against HIV-1, the administration of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) represents a logical alternative approach to prevent virus transmission. Here, we introduced two mutations encoding amino acid substitutions (M428L and N434S, collectively referred to as ‘LS’) into the genes encoding the crystallizable fragment domains of the highly potent HIV-specific 3BNC117 and 10-1074 bNAbs to increase their half-lives and evaluated their efficacy in blocking infection following repeated low-dose mucosal challenges of rhesus macaques ( Macaca mulatta) with the tier 2 SHIV AD8-EO. A single intravenous infusion of 10-1074-LS monoclonal antibodies markedly delayed virus acquisition for 18 to 37 weeks (median, 27 weeks), whereas the protective effect of the 3BNC117-LS bNAb was more modest (provided protection for 11–23 weeks; median, 17 weeks). Serum concentrations of the 10-1074-LS monoclonal antibody gradually declined and became undetectable in all recipients between weeks 26 and 41, whereas the 3BNC117-LS bNAb exhibited a shorter half-life. To model immunoprophylaxis against genetically diverse and/or neutralization-resistant HIV-1 strains, a combination of the 3BNC117-LS plus 10-1074-LS monoclonal antibodies was injected into macaques via the more clinically relevant subcutaneous route. Even though the administered mixture contained an amount of each bNAb that was nearly threefold less than the quantity of the single monoclonal antibody in the intravenous injections, the monoclonal antibody combination still protected macaques for a median of 20 weeks. The extended period of protection observed in macaques for the 3BNC117-LS plus 10-1074-LS combination could translate into an effective semiannual or annual immunoprophylaxis regimen for preventing HIV-1 infections in humans.

          Abstract

          Long-lived antibodies that can prevent viral infection of monkeys for 6 months may be a future alternative to an HIV vaccine.

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          Therapeutic Efficacy of Potent Neutralizing HIV-1-Specific Monoclonal Antibodies in SHIV-Infected Rhesus Monkeys

          HIV-1-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with extraordinary potency and breadth have recently been described. In humanized mice, combinations of mAbs have been shown to suppress viremia, but the therapeutic potential of these mAbs has not yet been evaluated in primates with an intact immune system. Here we show that administration of a cocktail of HIV-1-specific mAbs, as well as the single glycan-dependent mAb PGT121, resulted in a rapid and precipitous decline of plasma viremia to undetectable levels in rhesus monkeys chronically infected with the pathogenic virus SHIV-SF162P3. A single mAb infusion afforded up to a 3.1 log decline of plasma viral RNA in 7 days and also reduced proviral DNA in peripheral blood, gastrointestinal mucosa, and lymph nodes without the development of viral resistance. Moreover, following mAb administration, host Gag-specific T lymphocyte responses exhibited improved functionality. Virus rebounded in the majority of animals after a median of 56 days when serum mAb titers had declined to undetectable levels, although a subset of animals maintained long-term virologic control in the absence of further mAb infusions. These data demonstrate a profound therapeutic effect of potent neutralizing HIV-1-specific mAbs in SHIV-infected rhesus monkeys as well as an impact on host immune responses. Our findings strongly encourage the investigation of mAb therapy for HIV-1 in humans.
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            Antibody-mediated immunotherapy of macaques chronically infected with SHIV suppresses viraemia.

            Neutralizing antibodies can confer immunity to primate lentiviruses by blocking infection in macaque models of AIDS. However, earlier studies of anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) neutralizing antibodies administered to infected individuals or humanized mice reported poor control of virus replication and the rapid emergence of resistant variants. A new generation of anti-HIV-1 monoclonal antibodies, possessing extraordinary potency and breadth of neutralizing activity, has recently been isolated from infected individuals. These neutralizing antibodies target different regions of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein including the CD4-binding site, glycans located in the V1/V2, V3 and V4 regions, and the membrane proximal external region of gp41 (refs 9-14). Here we have examined two of the new antibodies, directed to the CD4-binding site and the V3 region (3BNC117 and 10-1074, respectively), for their ability to block infection and suppress viraemia in macaques infected with the R5 tropic simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)-AD8, which emulates many of the pathogenic and immunogenic properties of HIV-1 during infections of rhesus macaques. Either antibody alone can potently block virus acquisition. When administered individually to recently infected macaques, the 10-1074 antibody caused a rapid decline in virus load to undetectable levels for 4-7 days, followed by virus rebound during which neutralization-resistant variants became detectable. When administered together, a single treatment rapidly suppressed plasma viraemia for 3-5 weeks in some long-term chronically SHIV-infected animals with low CD4(+) T-cell levels. A second cycle of anti-HIV-1 monoclonal antibody therapy, administered to two previously treated animals, successfully controlled virus rebound. These results indicate that immunotherapy or a combination of immunotherapy plus conventional antiretroviral drugs might be useful as a treatment for chronically HIV-1-infected individuals experiencing immune dysfunction.
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              Broadly neutralizing antibodies and viral inducers decrease rebound from HIV-1 latent reservoirs in humanized mice.

              Latent reservoirs of HIV-1-infected cells are refractory to antiretroviral therapies (ART) and remain the major barrier to curing HIV-1. Because latently infected cells are long-lived, immunologically invisible, and may undergo homeostatic proliferation, a "shock and kill" approach has been proposed to eradicate this reservoir by combining ART with inducers of viral transcription. However, all attempts to alter the HIV-1 reservoir in vivo have failed to date. Using humanized mice, we show that broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) can interfere with establishment of a silent reservoir by Fc-FcR-mediated mechanisms. In established infection, bNAbs or bNAbs plus single inducers are ineffective in preventing viral rebound. However, bNAbs plus a combination of inducers that act by independent mechanisms synergize to decrease the reservoir as measured by viral rebound. Thus, combinations of inducers and bNAbs constitute a therapeutic strategy that impacts the establishment and maintenance of the HIV-1 reservoir in humanized mice.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                nussen@rockefeller.edu
                malm@nih.gov
                Journal
                Nat Med
                Nat. Med
                Nature Medicine
                Nature Publishing Group US (New York )
                1078-8956
                1546-170X
                16 April 2018
                16 April 2018
                2018
                : 24
                : 5
                : 610-616
                Affiliations
                [1 ]ISNI 0000 0001 2297 5165, GRID grid.94365.3d, Laboratory of Molecular Microbiology, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, , National Institutes of Health, ; Bethesda, MD USA
                [2 ]ISNI 0000 0001 2166 1519, GRID grid.134907.8, Laboratory of Molecular Immunology, , Rockefeller University, ; New York, NY USA
                [3 ]ISNI 0000 0000 9011 8547, GRID grid.239395.7, Center for Virology and Vaccine Research, , Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, ; Boston, MA USA
                [4 ]ISNI 0000 0001 2297 5165, GRID grid.94365.3d, Biostatistics Research Branch, Division of Clinical Research, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, , National Institutes of Health, ; Bethesda, MD USA
                [5 ]ISNI 0000 0001 2166 1519, GRID grid.134907.8, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Rockefeller University, ; New York, NY USA
                Article
                1
                10.1038/s41591-018-0001-2
                5989326
                29662199
                0b93fbef-f25b-4baf-a3fc-ae762f7acac7
                © The Author(s) 2018

                Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

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