27
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    4
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      A prospective view of animal and human Fasciolosis

      review-article

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Summary

          Fasciolosis, a food‐borne trematodiasis, results following infection with the parasites, Fasciola hepatica and Fasciola gigantica. These trematodes greatly affect the global agricultural community, infecting millions of ruminants worldwide and causing annual economic losses in excess of US $3 billion. Fasciolosis, an important zoonosis, is classified by WHO as a neglected tropical disease with an estimated 17 million people infected and a further 180 million people at risk of infection. The significant impact on agriculture and human health together with the increasing demand for animal‐derived food products to support global population growth demonstrate that fasciolosis is a major One Health problem. This review details the problematic issues surrounding fasciolosis control, including drug resistance, lack of diagnosis and the threat that hybridization of the Fasciola species poses to future animal and human health. We discuss how these parasites may mediate their long‐term survival through regulation and modulation of the host immune system, by altering the host immune homeostasis and/or by influencing the intestinal microbiome particularly in respect to concurrent infections with other pathogens. Large genome, transcriptome and proteomic data sets are now available to support an integrated One Health approach to develop novel diagnostic and control strategies for both animal and human disease.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 125

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Gut-residing segmented filamentous bacteria drive autoimmune arthritis via T helper 17 cells.

          Commensal microbes can have a substantial impact on autoimmune disorders, but the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms remain largely unexplored. We report that autoimmune arthritis was strongly attenuated in the K/BxN mouse model under germ-free (GF) conditions, accompanied by reductions in serum autoantibody titers, splenic autoantibody-secreting cells, germinal centers, and the splenic T helper 17 (Th17) cell population. Neutralization of interleukin-17 prevented arthritis development in specific-pathogen-free K/BxN mice resulting from a direct effect of this cytokine on B cells to inhibit germinal center formation. The systemic deficiencies of the GF animals reflected a loss of Th17 cells from the small intestinal lamina propria. Introduction of a single gut-residing species, segmented filamentous bacteria, into GF animals reinstated the lamina propria Th17 cell compartment and production of autoantibodies, and arthritis rapidly ensued. Thus, a single commensal microbe, via its ability to promote a specific Th cell subset, can drive an autoimmune disease. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Fascioliasis and other plant-borne trematode zoonoses.

            Fascioliasis and other food-borne trematodiases are included in the list of important helminthiases with a great impact on human development. Six plant-borne trematode species have been found to affect humans: Fasciola hepatica, Fasciola gigantica and Fasciolopsis buski (Fasciolidae), Gastrodiscoides hominis (Gastrodiscidae), Watsonius watsoni and Fischoederius elongatus (Paramphistomidae). Whereas F. hepatica and F. gigantica are hepatic, the other four species are intestinal parasites. The fasciolids and the gastrodiscid cause important zoonoses distributed throughout many countries, while W. watsoni and F. elongatus have been only accidentally detected in humans. Present climate and global changes appear to increasingly affect snail-borne helminthiases, which are strongly dependent on environmental factors. Fascioliasis is a good example of an emerging/re-emerging parasitic disease in many countries as a consequence of many phenomena related to environmental changes as well as man-made modifications. The ability of F. hepatica to spread is related to its capacity to colonise and adapt to new hosts and environments, even at the extreme inhospitality of very high altitude. Moreover, the spread of F. hepatica from its original European range to other continents is related to the geographic expansion of its original European lymnaeid intermediate host species Galba truncatula, the American species Pseudosuccinea columella, and its adaptation to other lymnaeid species authochthonous in the newly colonised areas. Although fasciolopsiasis and gastrodiscoidiasis can be controlled along with other food-borne parasitoses, fasciolopsiasis still remains a public health problem in many endemic areas despite sustained WHO control programmes. Fasciolopsiasis has become a re-emerging infection in recent years and gastrodiscoidiasis, initially supposed to be restricted to Asian countries, is now being reported in African countries.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Role of the commensal microbiota in normal and pathogenic host immune responses.

              The commensal microbiota that inhabit different parts of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract have been shaped by coevolution with the host species. The symbiotic relationship of the hundreds of microbial species with the host requires a tuned response that prevents host damage, e.g., inflammation, while tolerating the presence of the potentially beneficial microbes. Recent studies have begun to shed light on immunological processes that participate in maintenance of homeostasis with the microbiota and on how disturbance of host immunity or the microbial ecosystem can result in disease-provoking dysbiosis. Our growing appreciation of this delicate host-microbe relationship promises to influence our understanding of inflammatory diseases and infection by microbial pathogens and to provide new therapeutic opportunities. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                k.cwiklinski@qub.ac.uk
                Journal
                Parasite Immunol
                Parasite Immunol
                10.1111/(ISSN)1365-3024
                PIM
                Parasite Immunology
                John Wiley and Sons Inc. (Hoboken )
                0141-9838
                1365-3024
                08 July 2016
                September 2016
                : 38
                : 9 , One Health ( doiID: 10.1111/pim.2016.38.issue-9 )
                : 558-568
                Affiliations
                [ 1 ] School of Biological SciencesQueen's University Belfast BelfastUK
                [ 2 ] School of BiotechnologyDublin City University DublinRepublic of Ireland
                [ 3 ] The i3 Institute & School of Medical and Molecular BiosciencesUniversity of Technology Sydney Sydney NSWAustralia
                Author notes
                [* ] Correspondence: Krystyna Cwiklinski, School of Biological Sciences, Queen's University Belfast, 97 Lisburn Rd, Belfast, BT9 7BL, UK (e‐mail: k.cwiklinski@ 123456qub.ac.uk ).
                Article
                PIM12343
                10.1111/pim.12343
                5053257
                27314903
                0bd26cdb-403d-4cd1-b597-8a9741c3b699
                © 2016 The Authors. Parasite Immunology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

                This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution‐NonCommercial‐NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non‐commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made.

                Page count
                Figures: 1, Tables: 0, Pages: 11, Words: 10360
                Product
                Funding
                Funded by: European Research Council Advanced Grant (HELIVAC)
                Award ID: 322725
                Categories
                Commissioned Review Article
                Commissioned Review Articles
                Custom metadata
                2.0
                pim12343
                September 2016
                Converter:WILEY_ML3GV2_TO_NLMPMC version:4.9.4 mode:remove_FC converted:06.10.2016

                Immunology

                fasciola hepatica, immune modulation, innate immunity, microbiome, serodiagnosis

                Comments

                Comment on this article