Blog
About

2
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
2 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Face validity evaluation of screening tools for gaming disorder: Scope, language, and overpathologizing issues

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Aim

          Critics of gaming disorder (GD; i.e., Internet gaming disorder in the DSM-5; Gaming disorder in the ICD-11) have expressed concerns about the potential risks of misclassification (e.g., false positives). An important consideration of relevance to this discussion is the extent to which commonly used screening instruments contain appropriate, sensible, and relevant items. The aim of this review was to evaluate the face validity of items within current tools for GD.

          Methods

          A systematic review of databases identified 29 instruments. An item bank ( n = 417 items) was independently evaluated by three professional raters (i.e., a senior academic in clinical psychology, a senior psychometrician, and an academic/clinical psychologist) according to guidelines for defining and measuring addiction and gaming disorder.

          Findings

          Evaluation of the item bank identified issues related to: scope (i.e., “scope creep” or items of questionable relevance); language (i.e., confusing language, unusual wording or syntax); and overpathologizing (i.e., pathologizing typical and/or beneficial aspects or consequences of gaming). A total of 71 items across 23 tools had at least one face validity issue.

          Conclusions

          Most items (83%) demonstrated satisfactory face validity and were consistent with either the DSM-5 or ICD-11 GD classification. However, many tests contain at least one item that may pathologize normal gaming behaviors. Such items refer to basic changes in mood when gaming, a desire to play or continue playing games, and experiencing immersion when gaming. This analysis highlights the challenges of screening for problematic behaviors that are thought to arise within the context of normal recreational activities.

          Related collections

          Author and article information

          Journal
          2006
          Journal of Behavioral Addictions
          J Behav Addict
          Akadémiai Kiadó (Budapest )
          2062-5871
          2063-5303
          07 April 2020
          : 9
          : 1
          : 1-13
          Affiliations
          [1 ] College of Education, Psychology, & Social Work, Flinders University , Adelaide, Australia
          [2 ] Institute of Psychology , univUniversity of Lausanne , Lausanne, Switzerland
          [3 ] Addictive and Compulsive Behaviors Lab , Institute for Health and Behavior , univUniversity of Luxembourg , Esch-sur-Alzette, Luxembourg
          [4 ] Office of Medical Education , univUniversity of New South Wales (UNSW) Sydney, Australia
          [5 ] deptDepartment of Mental Health and Substance Use , World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland
          [6 ] School of Psychology , univThe University of Adelaide , Adelaide, SA, Australia
          Author notes
          [* ]Corresponding author. College of Education , Psychology, and Social Work , univFlinders University , GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia, Tel.: +61 (08) 8201 7800. E-mail: daniel.king@ 123456flinders.edu.au
          Article
          10.1556/2006.2020.00001
          © 2020 The Author(s)

          This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution‐NonCommercial 4.0 International License ( https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium for non-commercial purposes, provided the original author and source are credited, a link to the CC License is provided, and changes – if any – are indicated.

          Page count
          Figures: 00, Tables: 02, Equations: 00, References: 73, Pages: 13
          Product
          Self URI (journal page): https://akademiai.com/loi/2006
          Funding
          Funded by: Australian Research Council
          Award ID: DE170101198
          Categories
          Review Article

          Comments

          Comment on this article