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      Absolute quantification of proteins and phosphoproteins from cell lysates by tandem MS

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          Abstract

          A need exists for technologies that permit the direct quantification of differences in protein and posttranslationally modified protein expression levels. Here we present a strategy for the absolute quantification (termed AQUA) of proteins and their modification states. Peptides are synthesized with incorporated stable isotopes as ideal internal standards to mimic native peptides formed by proteolysis. These synthetic peptides can also be prepared with covalent modifications (e.g., phosphorylation, methylation, acetylation, etc.) that are chemically identical to naturally occurring posttranslational modifications. Such AQUA internal standard peptides are then used to precisely and quantitatively measure the absolute levels of proteins and posttranslationally modified proteins after proteolysis by using a selected reaction monitoring analysis in a tandem mass spectrometer. In the present work, the AQUA strategy was used to (i) quantify low abundance yeast proteins involved in gene silencing, (ii) quantitatively determine the cell cycle-dependent phosphorylation of Ser-1126 of human separase protein, and (iii) identify kinases capable of phosphorylating Ser-1501 of separase in an in vitro kinase assay. The methods described here represent focused, alternative approaches for studying the dynamically changing proteome.

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          Most cited references 12

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          Large-scale analysis of the yeast proteome by multidimensional protein identification technology.

          We describe a largely unbiased method for rapid and large-scale proteome analysis by multidimensional liquid chromatography, tandem mass spectrometry, and database searching by the SEQUEST algorithm, named multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT). MudPIT was applied to the proteome of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain BJ5460 grown to mid-log phase and yielded the largest proteome analysis to date. A total of 1,484 proteins were detected and identified. Categorization of these hits demonstrated the ability of this technology to detect and identify proteins rarely seen in proteome analysis, including low-abundance proteins like transcription factors and protein kinases. Furthermore, we identified 131 proteins with three or more predicted transmembrane domains, which allowed us to map the soluble domains of many of the integral membrane proteins. MudPIT is useful for proteome analysis and may be specifically applied to integral membrane proteins to obtain detailed biochemical information on this unwieldy class of proteins.
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            Quantitative analysis of complex protein mixtures using isotope-coded affinity tags.

            We describe an approach for the accurate quantification and concurrent sequence identification of the individual proteins within complex mixtures. The method is based on a class of new chemical reagents termed isotope-coded affinity tags (ICATs) and tandem mass spectrometry. Using this strategy, we compared protein expression in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, using either ethanol or galactose as a carbon source. The measured differences in protein expression correlated with known yeast metabolic function under glucose-repressed conditions. The method is redundant if multiple cysteinyl residues are present, and the relative quantification is highly accurate because it is based on stable isotope dilution techniques. The ICAT approach should provide a widely applicable means to compare quantitatively global protein expression in cells and tissues.
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              A proteomic view of the Plasmodium falciparum life cycle.

              The completion of the Plasmodium falciparum clone 3D7 genome provides a basis on which to conduct comparative proteomics studies of this human pathogen. Here, we applied a high-throughput proteomics approach to identify new potential drug and vaccine targets and to better understand the biology of this complex protozoan parasite. We characterized four stages of the parasite life cycle (sporozoites, merozoites, trophozoites and gametocytes) by multidimensional protein identification technology. Functional profiling of over 2,400 proteins agreed with the physiology of each stage. Unexpectedly, the antigenically variant proteins of var and rif genes, defined as molecules on the surface of infected erythrocytes, were also largely expressed in sporozoites. The detection of chromosomal clusters encoding co-expressed proteins suggested a potential mechanism for controlling gene expression.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
                Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
                Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
                0027-8424
                1091-6490
                June 10 2003
                May 27 2003
                June 10 2003
                : 100
                : 12
                : 6940-6945
                Article
                10.1073/pnas.0832254100
                165809
                12771378
                © 2003
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