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      Reactive oxygen species: role in the development of cancer and various chronic conditions

      review-article
      1 , 2 ,
      Journal of Carcinogenesis
      BioMed Central

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          Abstract

          Oxygen derived species such as superoxide radical, hydrogen peroxide, singlet oxygen and hydroxyl radical are well known to be cytotoxic and have been implicated in the etiology of a wide array of human diseases, including cancer. Various carcinogens may also partly exert their effect by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS) during their metabolism. Oxidative damage to cellular DNA can lead to mutations and may, therefore, play an important role in the initiation and progression of multistage carcinogenesis. The changes in DNA such as base modification, rearrangement of DNA sequence, miscoding of DNA lesion, gene duplication and the activation of oncogenes may be involved in the initiation of various cancers. Elevated levels of ROS and down regulation of ROS scavengers and antioxidant enzymes are associated with various human diseases including various cancers. ROS are also implicated in diabtes and neurodegenerative diseases. ROS influences central cellular processes such as proliferation a, apoptosis, senescence which are implicated in the development of cancer. Understanding the role of ROS as key mediators in signaling cascades may provide various opportunities for pharmacological intervention.

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          Most cited references83

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          p53 mutations in human cancers.

          Mutations in the evolutionarily conserved codons of the p53 tumor suppressor gene are common in diverse types of human cancer. The p53 mutational spectrum differs among cancers of the colon, lung, esophagus, breast, liver, brain, reticuloendothelial tissues, and hemopoietic tissues. Analysis of these mutations can provide clues to the etiology of these diverse tumors and to the function of specific regions of p53. Transitions predominate in colon, brain, and lymphoid malignancies, whereas G:C to T:A transversions are the most frequent substitutions observed in cancers of the lung and liver. Mutations at A:T base pairs are seen more frequently in esophageal carcinomas than in other solid tumors. Most transitions in colorectal carcinomas, brain tumors, leukemias, and lymphomas are at CpG dinucleotide mutational hot spots. G to T transversions in lung, breast, and esophageal carcinomas are dispersed among numerous codons. In liver tumors in persons from geographic areas in which both aflatoxin B1 and hepatitis B virus are cancer risk factors, most mutations are at one nucleotide pair of codon 249. These differences may reflect the etiological contributions of both exogenous and endogenous factors to human carcinogenesis.
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            Mitogen-activated protein kinases in apoptosis regulation.

            Cells are continuously exposed to a variety of environmental stresses and have to decide 'to be or not to be' depending on the types and strength of stress. Among the many signaling pathways that respond to stress, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family members are crucial for the maintenance of cells. Three subfamilies of MAPKs have been identified: extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs), c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs), and p38-MAPKs. It has been originally shown that ERKs are important for cell survival, whereas JNKs and p38-MAPKs were deemed stress responsive and thus involved in apoptosis. However, the regulation of apoptosis by MAPKs is more complex than initially thought and often controversial. In this review, we discuss MAPKs in apoptosis regulation with attention to mouse genetic models and critically point out the multiple roles of MAPKs.
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              Dietary carcinogens and anticarcinogens. Oxygen radicals and degenerative diseases.

              B. N. Ames (1983)
              The human diet contains a great variety of natural mutagens and carcinogens, as well as many natural antimutagens and anticarcinogens. Many of these mutagens and carcinogens may act through the generation of oxygen radicals. Oxygen radicals may also play a major role as endogenous initiators of degenerative processes, such as DNA damage and mutation (and promotion), that may be related to cancer, heart disease, and aging. Dietary intake of natural antioxidants could be an important aspect of the body's defense mechanism against these agents. Many antioxidants are being identified as anticarcinogens. Characterizing and optimizing such defense systems may be an important part of a strategy of minimizing cancer and other age-related diseases.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                J Carcinog
                Journal of Carcinogenesis
                BioMed Central (London )
                1477-3163
                2006
                11 May 2006
                : 5
                : 14
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Moores UCSD Cancer Center, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA
                [2 ]Department of Dermatology, University of Wisconsin – Madison, Medical Science Center, Madison, WI 53706, USA
                Article
                1477-3163-5-14
                10.1186/1477-3163-5-14
                1479806
                16689993
                0cd2e8cc-0308-4bb1-8076-1a52b4e4cb17
                Copyright © 2006 Waris and Ahsan; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

                This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

                History
                : 16 December 2005
                : 11 May 2006
                Categories
                Review

                Oncology & Radiotherapy
                Oncology & Radiotherapy

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