59
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Ancient and recent admixture layers in Sicily and Southern Italy trace multiple migration routes along the Mediterranean

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          The Mediterranean shores stretching between Sicily, Southern Italy and the Southern Balkans witnessed a long series of migration processes and cultural exchanges. Accordingly, present-day population diversity is composed by multiple genetic layers, which make the deciphering of different ancestral and historical contributes particularly challenging. We address this issue by genotyping 511 samples from 23 populations of Sicily, Southern Italy, Greece and Albania with the Illumina GenoChip Array, also including new samples from Albanian- and Greek-speaking ethno-linguistic minorities of Southern Italy. Our results reveal a shared Mediterranean genetic continuity, extending from Sicily to Cyprus, where Southern Italian populations appear genetically closer to Greek-speaking islands than to continental Greece. Besides a predominant Neolithic background, we identify traces of Post-Neolithic Levantine- and Caucasus-related ancestries, compatible with maritime Bronze-Age migrations. We argue that these results may have important implications in the cultural history of Europe, such as in the diffusion of some Indo-European languages. Instead, recent historical expansions from North-Eastern Europe account for the observed differentiation of present-day continental Southern Balkan groups. Patterns of IBD-sharing directly reconnect Albanian-speaking Arbereshe with a recent Balkan-source origin, while Greek-speaking communities of Southern Italy cluster with their Italian-speaking neighbours suggesting a long-term history of presence in Southern Italy.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 30

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Ancient human genomes suggest three ancestral populations for present-day Europeans

           Iosif Lazaridis,  Krause Johannes (corresponding) ,  Nick Patterson (2014)
          We sequenced genomes from a $\sim$7,000 year old early farmer from Stuttgart in Germany, an $\sim$8,000 year old hunter-gatherer from Luxembourg, and seven $\sim$8,000 year old hunter-gatherers from southern Sweden. We analyzed these data together with other ancient genomes and 2,345 contemporary humans to show that the great majority of present-day Europeans derive from at least three highly differentiated populations: West European Hunter-Gatherers (WHG), who contributed ancestry to all Europeans but not to Near Easterners; Ancient North Eurasians (ANE), who were most closely related to Upper Paleolithic Siberians and contributed to both Europeans and Near Easterners; and Early European Farmers (EEF), who were mainly of Near Eastern origin but also harbored WHG-related ancestry. We model these populations' deep relationships and show that EEF had $\sim$44% ancestry from a "Basal Eurasian" lineage that split prior to the diversification of all other non-African lineages.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Massive migration from the steppe was a source for Indo-European languages in Europe

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              A genetic atlas of human admixture history.

              Modern genetic data combined with appropriate statistical methods have the potential to contribute substantially to our understanding of human history. We have developed an approach that exploits the genomic structure of admixed populations to date and characterize historical mixture events at fine scales. We used this to produce an atlas of worldwide human admixture history, constructed by using genetic data alone and encompassing over 100 events occurring over the past 4000 years. We identified events whose dates and participants suggest they describe genetic impacts of the Mongol empire, Arab slave trade, Bantu expansion, first millennium CE migrations in Eastern Europe, and European colonialism, as well as unrecorded events, revealing admixture to be an almost universal force shaping human populations.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                stefania.sarno2@unibo.it
                donata.luiselli@unibo.it
                Journal
                Sci Rep
                Sci Rep
                Scientific Reports
                Nature Publishing Group UK (London )
                2045-2322
                16 May 2017
                16 May 2017
                2017
                : 7
                Affiliations
                [1 ]ISNI 0000 0004 1757 1758, GRID grid.6292.f, Laboratory of Molecular Anthropology, Department of Biological, Geological and Environmental Sciences, , University of Bologna, ; Bologna, Italy
                [2 ]ISNI 0000000404106064, GRID grid.82937.37, , Estonian Biocentre, ; Tartu, Estonia
                [3 ]ISNI 0000 0004 1757 3470, GRID grid.5608.b, Department of Biology, , University of Padova, ; Padova, Italy
                [4 ]ISNI 0000 0001 2183 4846, GRID grid.4711.3, Department of Archaeology and Anthropology, , IMF-CSIC, Spanish National Research Council, ; Barcelona, Spain
                [5 ]ISNI 0000 0001 2172 2676, GRID grid.5612.0, Department of Humanities, , Universitat Pompeu Fabra, ; Barcelona, Spain
                [6 ]ISNI 0000 0004 4914 1197, GRID grid.469873.7, Department of Linguistic and Cultural Evolution, , Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, ; Jena, Germany
                [7 ]ISNI 0000 0004 1757 1758, GRID grid.6292.f, Department of Cultural Heritage, , University of Bologna, ; Ravenna, Italy
                [8 ]ISNI 0000 0001 2292 3330, GRID grid.12306.36, Department of Biology, , University of Tirana, ; Tirana, Albania
                [9 ]ISNI 0000 0004 1762 5517, GRID grid.10776.37, Department of Biological, Chemical, and Pharmaceutical Sciences and Technologies, , University of Palermo, ; Palermo, Italy
                [10 ]ISNI 0000 0001 2216 0097, GRID grid.422252.1, , National Geographic Society, ; Washington, District of Columbia USA
                Article
                1802
                10.1038/s41598-017-01802-4
                5434004
                © The Author(s) 2017

                Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

                Categories
                Article
                Custom metadata
                © The Author(s) 2017

                Uncategorized

                Comments

                Comment on this article