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      An investigation into the contrasting growth response of lodgepole pine and white spruce to harvest-related soil disturbance

      1 , 2 , 3

      Canadian Journal of Forest Research

      Canadian Science Publishing

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          Stable Isotopes in Plant Ecology

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            Global patterns of foliar nitrogen isotopes and their relationships with climate, mycorrhizal fungi, foliar nutrient concentrations, and nitrogen availability.

            Ratios of nitrogen (N) isotopes in leaves could elucidate underlying patterns of N cycling across ecological gradients. To better understand global-scale patterns of N cycling, we compiled data on foliar N isotope ratios (delta(15)N), foliar N concentrations, mycorrhizal type and climate for over 11,000 plants worldwide. Arbuscular mycorrhizal, ectomycorrhizal, and ericoid mycorrhizal plants were depleted in foliar delta(15)N by 2 per thousand, 3.2 per thousand, 5.9 per thousand, respectively, relative to nonmycorrhizal plants. Foliar delta(15)N increased with decreasing mean annual precipitation and with increasing mean annual temperature (MAT) across sites with MAT >or= -0.5 degrees C, but was invariant with MAT across sites with MAT < -0.5 degrees C. In independent landscape-level to regional-level studies, foliar delta(15)N increased with increasing N availability; at the global scale, foliar delta(15)N increased with increasing foliar N concentrations and decreasing foliar phosphorus (P) concentrations. Together, these results suggest that warm, dry ecosystems have the highest N availability, while plants with high N concentrations, on average, occupy sites with higher N availability than plants with low N concentrations. Global-scale comparisons of other components of the N cycle are still required for better mechanistic understanding of the determinants of variation in foliar delta(15)N and ultimately global patterns in N cycling.
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              Development of scale-free climate data for Western Canada for use in resource management

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Canadian Journal of Forest Research
                Can. J. For. Res.
                Canadian Science Publishing
                0045-5067
                1208-6037
                March 2017
                March 2017
                : 47
                : 3
                : 340-348
                Affiliations
                [1 ]British Columbia Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations, P.O. Box 9536, Stn Prov Govt, Victoria, BC V8W 9C4, Canada.
                [2 ]Applied Research and Innovation, College of New Caledonia, 3330 22nd Ave., Prince George, BC V2N 1P8, Canada.
                [3 ]British Columbia Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations, BAG 6000, Smithers, BC V0J 2N0, Canada.
                Article
                10.1139/cjfr-2016-0386
                © 2017

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