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      Mindfulness-based stress reduction in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer receiving radioactive iodine therapy: a randomized controlled trial

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          Abstract

          Objective

          The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) on health-related quality of life (QoL), depression, and anxiety in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) receiving radioactive iodine therapy (RIT).

          Patients and methods

          A randomized controlled trial of MBSR with 120 DTC patients was performed. They were randomly assigned into the MBSR intervention group and usual care (UC) group. An 8-week MBSR program was administered to the MBSR group starting 8 weeks before RIT. Health-related QoL, depression, and anxiety were measured immediately before the start of MBSR (T1), immediately after RIT hospitalization was concluded (1 week after concluding the last MBSR session, T2), and 3 months after RIT hospitalization (T3), using the QoL Questionnaire Core 30 Items (QLQ-C30), Self-rating Depression Scale (SDS), and Self-rating Anxiety Scale (SAS).

          Results

          Fifty-three patients in the UC group and 49 patients in the MBSR group completed the study and were analyzed. Both the UC and MBSR groups reported low QoL and high SDS and SAS scores immediately after RIT hospitalization. Patients randomly assigned to the MBSR group showed significantly greater improvements in emotional function ( P=0.012, d=–0.03 for T2 and d=1.17 for T3), fatigue ( P=0.037, d=1.00 for T2 and d=–0.69 for T3), global QoL ( P=0.015, d=1.61 for T2 and d=1.56 for T3), depression ( P=0.027, d=–1.19 for T2 and d=–0.83 for T3), and anxiety ( P=0.043, d=–1.00 for T2 and d=–0.86 for T3).

          Conclusion

          An 8-week MBSR program significantly improved a wide range of scales in health-related QoL and mitigated depression and anxiety among DTC patients receiving RIT.

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          Most cited references 16

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          Effectiveness of mindfulness-based stress reduction in mood, breast- and endocrine-related quality of life, and well-being in stage 0 to III breast cancer: a randomized, controlled trial.

          To assess the effectiveness of mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) for mood, breast- and endocrine-specific quality of life, and well-being after hospital treatment in women with stage 0 to III breast cancer. A randomized, wait-listed, controlled trial was carried out in 229 women after surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy for breast cancer. Patients were randomly assigned to the 8-week MBSR program or standard care. Profile of Mood States (POMS; primary outcome), Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast (FACT-B), Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Endocrine Symptoms (FACT-ES) scales and the WHO five-item well-being questionnaire (WHO-5) evaluated mood, quality of life, and well-being at weeks 0, 8, and 12. For each outcome measure, a repeated-measures analysis of variance model, which incorporated week 0 measurements as a covariate, was used to compare treatment groups at 8 and 12 weeks. There were statistically significant improvements in outcome in the experimental group compared with control group at both 8 and 12 weeks (except as indicated) for POMS total mood disturbance (and its subscales of anxiety, depression [8 weeks only], anger [12 weeks only], vigor, fatigue, and confusion [8 weeks only]), FACT-B, FACT-ES, (and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy subscales of physical, social [8 weeks only], emotional, and functional well-being), and WHO-5. MSBR improved mood, breast- and endocrine-related quality of life, and well-being more effectively than standard care in women with stage 0 to III breast cancer, and these results persisted at three months. To our knowledge, this study provided novel evidence that MBSR can help alleviate long-term emotional and physical adverse effects of medical treatments, including endocrine treatments. MBSR is recommended to support survivors of breast cancer.
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            A systematic review of the benefits of mindfulness-based interventions following transient ischemic attack and stroke.

            Recent epidemiological studies have demonstrated an association between perceived psychological stress and ischemic stroke. A feature of stroke is recurrence; 30-40% within five-years following first transient ischemic attack/stroke. Equipping patients with skills and coping strategies to help reduce or manage perceived psychological stress may represent an important secondary prevention intervention. Mindfulness-based interventions are structured, group-based self-management programmes with potential to help people with long-term conditions cope better with physical, psychological, or emotional distress. Review evidence suggests significant benefits across a range of physical and mental health problems. However, we could find no evidence synthesis relating specifically to the benefits of mindfulness-based interventions following transient ischemic attack/stroke. The review aims to evaluate the benefits of mindfulness-based interventions following transient ischemic attack/stroke. Six major databases were searched using subject headings and key words. Papers were screened using review-specific criteria. Critical appraisal and data extraction were conducted independently by two reviewers. Statistical meta-analysis was not possible; therefore findings are presented in narrative form. Four studies involving 160 participants were reviewed. Three papers reported mindfulness-based interventions delivered to groups; one paper reported a mindfulness-based intervention which was delivered one to one. The results demonstrate a positive trend in favor of the benefits of mindfulness-based interventions across a range of psychological, physiological, and psychosocial outcomes including anxiety, depression, mental fatigue, blood pressure, perceived health, and quality of life. No evidence of harm was found. Following transient ischemic attack/stroke, people may derive a range of benefits from mindfulness-based interventions; however, further methodologically robust trials are required. © 2013 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2013 World Stroke Organization.
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              Quality of life in patients with thyroid cancer compared with the general population.

              Since patients with thyroid cancer have a very good prognosis overall, clinicians may often assume that their quality of life is comparable to the general population. We hypothesized that quality of life of thyroid cancer patients is lower compared with the general population while controlling the effect of age and gender.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Cancer Manag Res
                Cancer Manag Res
                Cancer Management and Research
                Cancer Management and Research
                Dove Medical Press
                1179-1322
                2019
                04 January 2019
                : 11
                : 467-474
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Nuclear Medicine, China-Japan Union Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin, China, jibin1983104@ 123456163.com ; maqingjiejlu@ 123456163.com
                [2 ]Department of Nursing, China-Japan Union Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin, China
                [3 ]Department of Psychology and Neurology, China-Japan Union Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin, China
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Bin Ji; Qingjie Ma, Department of Nuclear Medicine, China-Japan Union Hospital of Jilin University, NO.126 Xiantai Street Changchun, Jilin, China 130033, Tel +86 431 8499 5196, Email jibin1983104@ 123456163.com ; maqingjiejlu@ 123456163.com
                [*]

                These authors contributed equally to this work

                Article
                cmar-11-467
                10.2147/CMAR.S183299
                6324610
                © 2019 Liu et al. This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited

                The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed.

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                Original Research

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