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      The RosettaDock server for local protein–protein docking

      1 , 1 , 2 , *

      Nucleic Acids Research

      Oxford University Press

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          Abstract

          The RosettaDock server ( http://rosettadock.graylab.jhu.edu) identifies low-energy conformations of a protein–protein interaction near a given starting configuration by optimizing rigid-body orientation and side-chain conformations. The server requires two protein structures as inputs and a starting location for the search. RosettaDock generates 1000 independent structures, and the server returns pictures, coordinate files and detailed scoring information for the 10 top-scoring models. A plot of the total energy of each of the 1000 models created shows the presence or absence of an energetic binding funnel. RosettaDock has been validated on the docking benchmark set and through the Critical Assessment of PRedicted Interactions blind prediction challenge.

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          Most cited references 40

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          The Protein Data Bank.

          The Protein Data Bank (PDB; http://www.rcsb.org/pdb/ ) is the single worldwide archive of structural data of biological macromolecules. This paper describes the goals of the PDB, the systems in place for data deposition and access, how to obtain further information, and near-term plans for the future development of the resource.
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            PatchDock and SymmDock: servers for rigid and symmetric docking

            Here, we describe two freely available web servers for molecular docking. The PatchDock method performs structure prediction of protein–protein and protein–small molecule complexes. The SymmDock method predicts the structure of a homomultimer with cyclic symmetry given the structure of the monomeric unit. The inputs to the servers are either protein PDB codes or uploaded protein structures. The services are available at . The methods behind the servers are very efficient, allowing large-scale docking experiments.
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              Protein structure prediction and analysis using the Robetta server.

              The Robetta server (http://robetta.bakerlab.org) provides automated tools for protein structure prediction and analysis. For structure prediction, sequences submitted to the server are parsed into putative domains and structural models are generated using either comparative modeling or de novo structure prediction methods. If a confident match to a protein of known structure is found using BLAST, PSI-BLAST, FFAS03 or 3D-Jury, it is used as a template for comparative modeling. If no match is found, structure predictions are made using the de novo Rosetta fragment insertion method. Experimental nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) constraints data can also be submitted with a query sequence for RosettaNMR de novo structure determination. Other current capabilities include the prediction of the effects of mutations on protein-protein interactions using computational interface alanine scanning. The Rosetta protein design and protein-protein docking methodologies will soon be available through the server as well.
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                Author and article information

                Affiliations
                1Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering and 2Program in Molecular and Computational Biophysics, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
                Author notes
                *To whom correspondence should be addressed. +1 410 516 5313+1 410 516 5510 jgray@ 123456jhu.edu
                Journal
                Nucleic Acids Res
                Nucleic Acids Res
                nar
                nar
                Nucleic Acids Research
                Oxford University Press
                0305-1048
                1362-4962
                1 July 2008
                28 April 2008
                28 April 2008
                : 36
                : Web Server issue
                : W233-W238
                18442991 2447798 10.1093/nar/gkn216 gkn216
                © 2008 The Author(s)

                This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/uk/) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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