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      Perspectives on invasive amphibians in Brazil

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          Abstract

          Introduced species have the potential to become invasive and jeopardize entire ecosystems. The success of species establishing viable populations outside their original extent depends primarily on favorable climatic conditions in the invasive ranges. Species distribution modeling (SDM) can thus be used to estimate potential habitat suitability for populations of invasive species. Here we review the status of six amphibian species with invasive populations in Brazil (four domestic species and two imported species). We (i) modeled the current habitat suitability and future potential distribution of these six focal species, (ii) reported on the disease status of Eleutherodactylus johnstonei and Phyllodytes luteolus, and (iii) quantified the acoustic overlap of P. luteolus and Leptodactylus labyrinthicus with three co-occurring native species. Our models indicated that all six invasive species could potentially expand their ranges in Brazil within the next few decades. In addition, our SDMs predicted important expansions in available habitat for 2 out of 6 invasive species under future (2100) climatic conditions. We detected high acoustic niche overlap between invasive and native amphibian species, underscoring that acoustic interference might reduce mating success in local frogs. Despite the American bullfrog Lithobates catesbeianus being recognized as a potential reservoir for the frog-killing fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis ( Bd) in Brazil, we did not detect Bd in the recently introduced population of E. johnstonei and P. luteolus in the State of São Paulo. We emphasize that the number of invasive amphibian species in Brazil is increasing exponentially, highlighting the urgent need to monitor and control these populations and decrease potential impacts on the locally biodiverse wildlife.

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          Most cited references 108

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          Biological invasions: Lessons for ecology.

           D. L. Lodge (1993)
          Anthropogenic introduction of species is homogenizing the earth's biota. Consequences of introductions are sometimes great, and are directly related to global climate change, biodiversity AND release of genetically engineered organisms. Progress in invasion studies hinges on the following research trends: realization that species' ranges are naturally dynamic; recognition that colonist species and target communities cannot be studied independently, but that species-community interactions determine invasion success; increasingly quantitative tests of how species and habitat characteristics relate to invasibility and impact; recognition from paleobiological, experimental and modeling studies that history, chance and determinism together shape community invasibility. Copyright © 1993. Published by Elsevier Ltd.
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            On the relationship between niche and distribution

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              Emerging infectious disease and the loss of biodiversity in a Neotropical amphibian community.

               K R Lips,  F Brem,  R Brenes (2006)
              Pathogens rarely cause extinctions of host species, and there are few examples of a pathogen changing species richness and diversity of an ecological community by causing local extinctions across a wide range of species. We report the link between the rapid appearance of a pathogenic chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in an amphibian community at El Copé, Panama, and subsequent mass mortality and loss of amphibian biodiversity across eight families of frogs and salamanders. We describe an outbreak of chytridiomycosis in Panama and argue that this infectious disease has played an important role in amphibian population declines. The high virulence and large number of potential hosts of this emerging infectious disease threaten global amphibian diversity.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Role: ConceptualizationRole: Data curationRole: Formal analysisRole: Funding acquisitionRole: InvestigationRole: MethodologyRole: Project administrationRole: ResourcesRole: ValidationRole: VisualizationRole: Writing – original draftRole: Writing – review & editing
                Role: Funding acquisitionRole: ResourcesRole: Writing – review & editing
                Role: Software
                Role: Formal analysis
                Role: Data curationRole: Investigation
                Role: Data curationRole: Formal analysisRole: InvestigationRole: MethodologyRole: ResourcesRole: Writing – review & editing
                Role: Funding acquisitionRole: InvestigationRole: ResourcesRole: Writing – review & editing
                Role: ConceptualizationRole: Formal analysisRole: Funding acquisitionRole: InvestigationRole: MethodologyRole: ResourcesRole: SupervisionRole: Writing – review & editing
                Role: Editor
                Journal
                PLoS One
                PLoS ONE
                plos
                plosone
                PLoS ONE
                Public Library of Science (San Francisco, CA USA )
                1932-6203
                22 September 2017
                2017
                : 12
                : 9
                Affiliations
                [1 ] Laboratório Multiusuário de Bioacústica (LMBio) and Laboratório de História Natural de Anfíbios Brasileiros (LaHNAB), Departamento de Biologia Animal, Instituto de Biologia, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil
                [2 ] Department of Biological Sciences, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama, United States of America
                [3 ] Centro de Pesquisas Meteorológicas e Climáticas Aplicadas à Agricultura (CEPAGRI), Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Cidade Universitária Zeferino Vaz, Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil
                [4 ] Pontifícia Universidade Católica de São Paulo, Praça Dr. Ermírio de Morais, Sorocaba, São Paulo, Brazil
                [5 ] Departamento de Zoologia, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade Estadual de Paulista, Rio Claro, São Paulo, Brazil
                Universitat Trier, GERMANY
                Author notes

                Competing Interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

                Article
                PONE-D-16-42357
                10.1371/journal.pone.0184703
                5609743
                28938024
                © 2017 Forti et al

                This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

                Page count
                Figures: 5, Tables: 1, Pages: 22
                Product
                Funding
                Funded by: funder-id http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100001807, Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo;
                Award ID: 2011/51694-7
                Award Recipient : Felipe Felipe Toledo
                Funded by: funder-id http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100001807, Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo;
                Award ID: 2011/52070-7
                Award Recipient : Felipe Felipe Toledo
                Funded by: funder-id http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100001807, Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo;
                Award ID: 2014/23388-7
                Award Recipient : Felipe Felipe Toledo
                Funded by: funder-id http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100003593, Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico;
                Award ID: 302589/2013-9
                Award Recipient : Felipe Felipe Toledo
                Funded by: funder-id http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100003593, Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico;
                Award ID: 405285/2013-2
                Award Recipient : Felipe Felipe Toledo
                Funded by: funder-id http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100003593, Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico;
                Award ID: 312895/2014-3
                Award Recipient : Guilherme Guilherme Becker
                Funded by: funder-id http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100003593, Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico;
                Award ID: 161812/2011-2
                Award Recipient :
                Funded by: funder-id http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100001807, Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo;
                Award ID: 2013/21519-4
                Award Recipient :
                Funded by: funder-id http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100001807, Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo;
                Award ID: 2013/02219-0
                Award Recipient : Felipe Felipe Toledo
                Funded by: funder-id http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100001807, Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo;
                Award ID: 2013/50741-7
                Award Recipient :
                Funded by: funder-id http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100001807, Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo;
                Award ID: 2014/50342-8
                Award Recipient :
                Funded by: funder-id http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100003593, Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico;
                Award ID: 302518/2013-4
                Award Recipient :
                Funded by: Coordination for the Improvement of Higher Education Personnel
                Award ID: 3855/13-9
                Award Recipient :
                Funded by: funder-id http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100003593, Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico;
                Award ID: #438675/2016-9
                Award Recipient :
                The São Paulo Research Foundation (FAPESP) provided financial support (grant #2011/51694-7, #2011/52070-7, #2014/23388-7) to LFT. The National Council for Scientific and Technological Development (CNPq) provided support for LFT (#302589/2013-9; #405285/2013-2), to CGB (#312895/2014-3), to ISO (#161812/2011-2), and to LRF (#438675/2016-9). LRF and LT were supported by grants #2013/21519-4 and #2013/02219-0, São Paulo Research Foundation (FAPESP). CFBH was supported by grants #2013/50741-7 and #2014/50342-8, São Paulo Research Foundation (FAPESP) and CNPq (302518/2013-4) for a research fellowship. Coordination for the Improvement of Higher Education Personnel (CAPES) provided support to ISO (#3855/13-9). The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.
                Categories
                Research Article
                Ecology and Environmental Sciences
                Species Colonization
                Invasive Species
                People and places
                Geographical locations
                South America
                Brazil
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Ecology
                Ecosystems
                Forests
                Ecology and Environmental Sciences
                Ecology
                Ecosystems
                Forests
                Ecology and Environmental Sciences
                Terrestrial Environments
                Forests
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Organisms
                Eukaryota
                Animals
                Vertebrates
                Amphibians
                Earth Sciences
                Geomorphology
                Topography
                Landforms
                Islands
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Organisms
                Eukaryota
                Animals
                Vertebrates
                Amphibians
                Frogs
                Physical Sciences
                Physics
                Acoustics
                Bioacoustics
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Bioacoustics
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Ecology
                Ecological Niches
                Ecology and Environmental Sciences
                Ecology
                Ecological Niches
                Custom metadata
                The audio files used in this study are publicly available from the Zenodo repository at the following URL: https://zenodo.org/record/883621#.Waq5hciGOMo. All other relevant data are available from the Figshare repository at the following URL: https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.5393977.

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