Blog
About

0
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found

      Mortality in Dementia

      , ,

      Neuroepidemiology

      S. Karger AG

      Dementia, Alzheimer’s disease, Vascular dementia

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          The objective of this work is to provide a review of the mortality risk in dementia and potential influencing factors. In order to do so, studies on mortality in dementia based on population-based samples of the last 15 years published in PubMed, Web of Science and PSYNDEXplus were considered. Without exception, all types of dementia are associated with a considerably increased mortality risk. Moreover, the risk of death rises with advancing severity of the disorder. Often, a more favorable course of the disease can be found in Alzheimer’s disease. Further questions, such as the influence of age and sex, cannot be answered conclusively. Very little information can be found on aspects concerning comorbidity, APOE polymorphism or depressive symptomatology.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 25

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Influence of education and occupation on the incidence of Alzheimer's disease.

          Several cross-sectional studies have found an association between Alzheimer's disease (AD) and limited educational experience. It has been difficult to establish whether educational experience is a risk factor for AD because educational attainment can influence performance on diagnostic tests. This study was designed to determine whether limited educational level and occupational attainment are risk factors for incident dementia. Cohort incidence study. General community. A total of 593 nondemented individuals aged 60 years or older who were listed in a registry of individuals at risk for dementia in North Manhattan, NY, were identified and followed up. We reexamined subjects 1 to 4 years later with the identical standardized neurological and neuropsychological measures. Incident dementia. We used Cox proportional hazards models, adjusting for age and gender, to estimate the relative risk (RR) of incident dementia associated with low educational and occupational attainment. Of the 593 subjects, 106 became demented; all but five of these met research criteria for AD. The risk of dementia was increased in subjects with either low education (RR, 2.02; 95% confidence interval [Cl], 1.33 to 3.06) or low lifetime occupational attainment (RR, 2.25; 95% Cl, 1.32 to 3.84). Risk was greatest for subjects with both low education and low life-time occupational attainment (RR, 2.87; 95% Cl, 1.32 to 3.84). The data suggest that increased educational and occupational attainment may reduce the risk of incident AD, either by decreasing ease of clinical detection of AD or by imparting a reserve that delays the onset of clinical manifestations.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            A population-based study of dementia in 85-year-olds.

            The aim of this study was to investigate the causes, severity, and prevalence of dementia in a representative sample of 494 85-year-olds living in Gothenburg, Sweden. The study included a psychiatric interview, neuropsychological and physical examinations, comprehensive laboratory tests, electrocardiography, chest radiography, computed tomography (CT) of the head, and analysis of cerebrospinal fluid. A person close to each subject was also interviewed. Dementia was defined according to the criteria proposed in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (third edition, revised), Alzheimer's disease according to the criteria of the National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke and the Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders Association, and vascular dementia according to recently proposed criteria that incorporate information from CT scanning and the patient's neurologic history. The prevalence of dementia was 29.8 percent (147 subjects). The condition was mild in 8.3 percent, moderate in 10.3 percent, and severe in 11.1 percent. There were no significant sex-related differences in prevalence or severity. Of the subjects with dementia, 43.5 percent had Alzheimer's disease, 46.9 percent had vascular dementia (multi-infarct dementia in 34.6 percent, dementia related to cerebral hypoperfusion in 4.1 percent, and mixed dementia in 8.2 percent), and 9.5 percent had dementia due to other causes. The three-year mortality rate was 23.1 percent in the subjects without dementia, 42.2 percent in the patients with Alzheimer's disease, and 66.7 percent in the patients with vascular dementia. Infarcts detected by CT scanning were significantly more common in the subjects with dementia than in those without it (27.9 percent vs. 12.6 percent). Dementia was present in nearly a third of unselected 85-year-olds in Sweden. Almost half these subjects appeared to have vascular dementia, which may currently be more amenable to prevention or treatment than Alzheimer's disease.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Dementia, cognitive impairment and mortality in persons aged 65 and over living in the community: a systematic review of the literature.

               P Saz,  M. Dewey (2001)
              No recent attempt has been made to synthesise information on mortality and dementia despite the theoretical and practical interest in the topic. Our objective was to estimate the influence on mortality of cognitive impairment and dementia. Data sources were Medline, Embase, personal files and colleagues' records. Studies were considered if they included a majority of persons aged 65 and over at baseline either drawn from a total community sample or drawn from a random sample from the community. Samples from health care facilities were excluded. The search located 68 community studies. Effect sizes were extracted from the studies and if they were not included in the published studies, effect sizes were calculated where possible: this was possible for 23 studies of cognitive impairment and 32 of dementia. No attempt was made to contact authors for missing data. For the studies of cognitive impairment Fisher's method (a vote counting method), gave a p-value (from eight studies) of 0.00001. For studies of dementia, age-adjusted confidence intervals (CI) were pooled (odds ratio (OR) 2.63 with 95% CI 2.17 to 3.21 from six studies). Levels of cognitive impairment commonly found in community studies give rise to an increased risk of mortality, and this appears to be true even for quite mild levels of impairment. The analysis confirms the increased risk of mortality for dementia, but reveals a dearth of information on the causes of the excess mortality and on possible effect modification by age, dementia subtype or other variables. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                NED
                Neuroepidemiology
                10.1159/issn.0251-5350
                Neuroepidemiology
                S. Karger AG
                0251-5350
                1423-0208
                2005
                September 2005
                02 September 2005
                : 25
                : 3
                : 153-162
                Affiliations
                Klinik und Poliklinik für Psychiatrie der Universität Leipzig, Leipzig, Deutschland
                Article
                86680 Neuroepidemiology 2005;25:153–162
                10.1159/000086680
                15990446
                © 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel

                Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

                Page count
                Tables: 3, References: 54, Pages: 10
                Categories
                Review Paper

                Comments

                Comment on this article