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      Gene expression profiles among immature and adult reproductive castes of the termite Reticulitermes flavipes.

      Insect Molecular Biology

      biosynthesis, genetics, Adenosine Triphosphatases, Animals, Base Sequence, Expressed Sequence Tags, Gene Expression Profiling, Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental, physiology, HSP70 Heat-Shock Proteins, Insect Proteins, Isoptera, growth & development, metabolism, Molecular Sequence Data, Nymph, Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis, Phosphotransferases (Alcohol Group Acceptor), Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2, Ribosomal Proteins, Sequence Alignment, Vitellogenins, AMP Deaminase

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          Abstract

          Array-based genomic studies were conducted with the goal of identifying immature (i.e. nymph) and adult reproductive caste-biased gene expression in the termite Reticulitermes flavipes. Using cDNA macro-arrays, we identified thirty-four nymph-biased genes falling into eight ontogenic categories. Based on gene expression profiles among diverse castes and developmental stages (determined by quantitative PCR), several important trends emerged. These findings highlight the importance of several developmental and survival-based factors among immature and adult termite reproductives, including: vitellogenesis, nutrient storage, juvenile hormone sequestration, ribosomal translational and filtering mechanisms, fatty acid biosynthesis, apoptosis inhibition, and both endogenous and symbiont cellulase-assisted nutrition. These findings are highly significant as they are the first to elucidate the molecular biology underlying termite reproductive caste differentiation and reproductive caste-specific biology. Other gene expression results are in agreement with previous findings that suggest roles for vitellogenin-like haemolymph proteins in soldier caste differentiation.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          15663773
          10.1111/j.1365-2583.2004.00527.x

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