7
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Cigarette smoking and autoimmune disease: what can we learn from epidemiology?

      ,

      Lupus

      SAGE Publications

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 91

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          Epidemiology and Estimated Population Burden of Selected Autoimmune Diseases in the United States

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            The shared epitope hypothesis. an approach to understanding the molecular genetics of susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Quantification of the influence of cigarette smoking on rheumatoid arthritis: results from a population based case-control study, using incident cases.

              To quantify the influence of cigarette smoking on the risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA). 679 cases and 847 controls included during May 1996-June 2000 in a case-control study, using incident cases, comprising the population aged 18-70 years of a defined area of Sweden, were investigated. A case was defined as a person from the study base who received for the first time a diagnosis of RA using the 1987 American College of Rheumatology criteria, and controls were randomly selected from the study base. Self reported smoking habits among cases and controls, and rheumatoid factor status among cases were registered. The incidence of RA in current smokers, ex-smokers, and ever-smokers, respectively, was compared with that of never-smokers. Current smokers, ex-smokers, and ever-smokers of both sexes had an increased risk for seropositive RA (for ever-smokers the odds ratio was 1.7 (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.2 to 2.3) for women, and 1.9 (95% CI 1.0 to 3.5) for men), but not for seronegative RA. The increased risk was only apparent among subjects who had smoked > or =20 years, was evident at an intensity of smoking of 6-9 cigarettes/day, and remained for up to 10-19 years after smoking cessation. The risk increased with increasing cumulative dose of smoking. Smokers of both sexes have an increased risk of developing seropositive, but not seronegative, RA. The increased risk occurs after a long duration, but merely a moderate intensity, of smoking and may remain for several years after smoking cessation.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Lupus
                Lupus
                SAGE Publications
                0961-2033
                1477-0962
                July 02 2016
                July 02 2016
                : 15
                : 11
                : 737-745
                Article
                10.1177/0961203306069344
                © 2016

                Comments

                Comment on this article