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      Usability is the Best Policy: Public Policy and the Lived Experience of Transport Systems in London

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      Proceedings of HCI 2007 The 21st British HCI Group Annual Conference University of Lancaster, UK (HCI)

      British HCI Group Annual Conference

      3 - 7 September 2007

      Ubiquitous computing, embodied interaction, public policy, e-government, lived experience, usability, design

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          Abstract

          This paper explores the relations between public policy and usability in lived experience, drawing on 3 case studies in one important area of urban policy, transport. For these studies, discourse from interviews and focus groups with a total of 120 participants, and a written corpus of over 80 documents, were collected and analyzed, together with interviews with 25 key staff and observations of user interactions both in the laboratory and in situ. The resulting rich dataset presents a new perspective on e-government systems in use. The results show that usability must be prioritised at the policy design stage; it cannot be left to implementation. Failure to do so is experienced by users in systems which fail to work together to meet their needs. Negative experiences, in turn, may lead to loss of trust and legitimacy, and detract from public value and community well-being. These findings, therefore, provide lessons from HCI insights for both public policy-makers and implementers of e-government systems. The paper concludes by suggesting some HCI methods for pre-venting usability problems in e-government systems, by involving users in design in order to understand their lived experiences around the ecology of the systems.

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          Most cited references 9

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          The support of autonomy and the control of behavior.

          In this article we suggest that events and contexts relevant to the initiation and regulation of intentional behavior can function either to support autonomy (i.e., to promote choice) or to control behavior (i.e., to pressure one toward specific outcomes). Research herein reviewed indicates that this distinction is relevant to specific external events and to general interpersonal contexts as well as to specific internal events and to general personality orientations. That is, the distinction is relevant whether one's analysis focuses on social psychological variables or on personality variables. The research review details those contextual and person factors that tend to promote autonomy and those that tend to control. Furthermore, it shows that autonomy support has generally been associated with more intrinsic motivation, greater interest, less pressure and tension, more creativity, more cognitive flexibility, better conceptual learning, a more positive emotional tone, higher self-esteem, more trust, greater persistence of behavior change, and better physical and psychological health than has control. Also, these results have converged across different assessment procedures, different research methods, and different subject populations. On the basis of these results, we present an organismic perspective in which we argue that the regulation of intentional behavior varies along a continuum from autonomous (i.e., self-determined) to controlled. The relation of this organismic perspective to historical developments in empirical psychology is discussed, with a particular emphasis on its implications for the study of social psychology and personality.
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            Steps Toward an Ecology of Infrastructure: Design and Access for Large Information Spaces

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              Technology affordances

               William Gaver (1991)
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Conference
                September 2007
                September 2007
                : 1-10
                Affiliations
                Department of Computer Science

                University College London

                Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT
                Article
                10.14236/ewic/HCI2007.4
                © Philip Inglesant et al. Published by BCS Learning and Development Ltd. Proceedings of HCI 2007 The 21st British HCI Group Annual Conference University of Lancaster, UK

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                Proceedings of HCI 2007 The 21st British HCI Group Annual Conference University of Lancaster, UK
                HCI
                21
                Lancaster, UK
                3 - 7 September 2007
                Electronic Workshops in Computing (eWiC)
                British HCI Group Annual Conference
                Product
                Product Information: 1477-9358BCS Learning & Development
                Self URI (journal page): https://ewic.bcs.org/
                Categories
                Electronic Workshops in Computing

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