39
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Meta-analyses of human gut microbes associated with obesity and IBD

      1 , 2 , 2 , 3 , 4

      FEBS letters

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Recent studies have linked human gut microbes to obesity and inflammatory bowel disease, but consistent signals have been difficult to identify. Here we test for indicator taxa and general features of the microbiota that are generally consistent across studies of obesity and of IBD, focusing on studies involving high-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene (which we could process using a common computational pipeline). We find that IBD has a consistent signature across studies and allows high classification accuracy of IBD from non-IBD subjects, but that although subjects can be classified as lean or obese within each individual study with statistically significant accuracy, consistent with the ability of the microbiota to experimentally transfer this phenotype, signatures of obesity are not consistent between studies even when the data are analyzed with consistent methods. The results suggest that correlations between microbes and clinical conditions with different effect sizes (e.g. the large effect size of IBD versus the small effect size of obesity) may require different cohort selection and analysis strategies.

          Related collections

          Author and article information

          Journal
          0155157
          3696
          FEBS Lett
          FEBS Lett.
          FEBS letters
          0014-5793
          1873-3468
          28 September 2016
          13 October 2014
          17 November 2014
          04 October 2016
          : 588
          : 22
          : 4223-4233
          Affiliations
          [1 ]Department of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, USA
          [2 ]BioFrontiers Institute, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, USA
          [3 ]Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, USA
          [4 ]Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Boulder, CO 80309, USA
          Author notes
          [* ]To whom correspondence should be addressed: Rob Knight, Professor, BioFrontiers Institute, UCB 596, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, USA Tel: 303-492-1984, Fax: 303-492-7744, rob@ 123456colorado.edu
          Article
          PMC5050012 PMC5050012 5050012 nihpa636064
          10.1016/j.febslet.2014.09.039
          5050012
          25307765
          Categories
          Article

          Comments

          Comment on this article