Blog
About

3
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Visual cortical prosthesis with a geomagnetic compass restores spatial navigation in blind rats.

      Current biology : CB

      Elsevier BV

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Allocentric sense is one of the major components that underlie spatial navigation. In blind patients, the difficulty in spatial exploration is attributed, at least partly, to the deficit of absolute direction perception. In support of this notion, we announce that blind adult rats can perform spatial tasks normally when externally provided with real-time feedback of their head directions. Head-mountable microstimulators coupled with a digital geomagnetic compass were bilaterally implanted in the primary visual cortex of adult rats whose eyelids had been sutured. These "blind" rats were trained to seek food pellets in a T-shaped maze or a more complicated maze. Within tens of trials, they learned to manage the geomagnetic information source to solve the mazes. Their performance levels and navigation strategies were similar to those of normal sighted, intact rats. Thus, blind rats can recognize self-location through extrinsically provided stereotactic cues.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 17

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          Cognitive maps in rats and men.

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Place units in the hippocampus of the freely moving rat.

             John O'Keefe (1976)
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              The basic uniformity in structure of the neocortex.

              The number of neuronal cell bodies has been counted in a narrow strip (30 micrometers) through the depth of the neocortex in several different functional areas (motor, somatic sensory, area 17, frontal, parietal and temporal and in many species (mouse, rat, cat, monkey and man). With the exception of area 17 of the visual cortex in a number of primates the same absolute number (congruent to 110) of neurons has been found in all areas and in all species. In the binocular part of area 17 of the primates there are approximately 2.5 times more neurons. Thus in mammalian evolution the area of the neocortex increases in larger brains but the number of neurons through the depth remains constant, except in area 17 of primates. From these and other findings it is suggested that the intrinsic structure of the neocortex is basically more uniform than has been thought and that differences in cytoarchitecture and function reflect differences in connections.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                10.1016/j.cub.2015.02.063
                25843028

                Comments

                Comment on this article