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      Tenecteplase-tissue-type plasminogen activator evaluation for minor ischemic stroke with proven occlusion.

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          Abstract

          Minor stroke and transient ischemic attack with an intracranial occlusion are associated with neurological deterioration and disability. Tenecteplase (TNK-tissue-type plasminogen activator) compared with alteplase is easier to administer, has a longer half-life, higher fibrin specificity, possibly a lower rate of intracranial hemorrhage, and may be an ideal thrombolytic agent in this population.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Stroke
          Stroke
          Ovid Technologies (Wolters Kluwer Health)
          1524-4628
          0039-2499
          Mar 2015
          : 46
          : 3
          Affiliations
          [1 ] From the Calgary Stroke Program, Departments of Clinical Neurosciences (S.B.C., V.D., J.M., C.K., A.M.D., E.E.S., S.S., M.G., B.K.M., P.A.B., M.D.H.), Radiology (S.B.C., A.M.D., E.E.S., M.G., S.P., B.K.M., M.D.H.), Community Health Sciences (E.E.S., M.D.H.), and Medicine (M.D.H.), and Hotchkiss Brain Institute (S.B.C., A.M.D., E.E.S., M.G., B.K.M., P.A.B., M.D.H.), Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; Department of Medicine (Neurology), Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada (D.D.); Vancouver Stroke Program, Department of Medicine, Division of Neurology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada (T.F., N.A.); and Department of Neurosciences, Enfant-Jésus Hospital, Laval University, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada (M.-C.C.). scoutts@ucalgary.ca.
          [2 ] From the Calgary Stroke Program, Departments of Clinical Neurosciences (S.B.C., V.D., J.M., C.K., A.M.D., E.E.S., S.S., M.G., B.K.M., P.A.B., M.D.H.), Radiology (S.B.C., A.M.D., E.E.S., M.G., S.P., B.K.M., M.D.H.), Community Health Sciences (E.E.S., M.D.H.), and Medicine (M.D.H.), and Hotchkiss Brain Institute (S.B.C., A.M.D., E.E.S., M.G., B.K.M., P.A.B., M.D.H.), Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; Department of Medicine (Neurology), Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada (D.D.); Vancouver Stroke Program, Department of Medicine, Division of Neurology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada (T.F., N.A.); and Department of Neurosciences, Enfant-Jésus Hospital, Laval University, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada (M.-C.C.).
          Article
          STROKEAHA.114.008504
          10.1161/STROKEAHA.114.008504
          25677596

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