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      The Prospective Association Between the Five Factor Personality Model With Health Behaviors and Health Behavior Clusters

      research-article
      a , b , * , a ,
      Europe's Journal of Psychology
      PsychOpen
      alcohol, diet, epidemiology, exercise, psychology, sleep, smoking

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          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          To examine the prospective association of personality with individual behavior, multibehavior and clustered health behavior profiles. A prospective study design was employed. Two hundred young adults provided baseline data and 126 (mean age: 21.6 yrs) provide complete data for a 5-month follow-up assessment (63% response rate). Personality and health behaviors (and covariates) were assessed via validated questionnaires. A multibehavior index variable was created ranging from 0-5; two separate health behavior cluster indices were created, including high (4-5 behaviors) vs. low (2 or fewer) behavior adoption and an energy balance cluster (MVPA and diet). When examining MVPA as a continuous variable, the personality trait conscientiousness was prospectively associated with MVPA and a healthy diet. Extraversion was prospectively associated with high (vs. low) behavioral clustering (OR = 1.18; 95% CI: 1.00-1.40) and conscientiousness was prospectively associated with energy balance clustering (OR = 1.09; 95% CI: 1.01-1.17). Extraversion, conscientiousness, openness to experience, and agreeableness were associated with select health-related behaviors. Further, extraversion and conscientiousness were associated with health behavior clustering.

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          Most cited references51

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          Common method biases in behavioral research: A critical review of the literature and recommended remedies.

          Interest in the problem of method biases has a long history in the behavioral sciences. Despite this, a comprehensive summary of the potential sources of method biases and how to control for them does not exist. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to examine the extent to which method biases influence behavioral research results, identify potential sources of method biases, discuss the cognitive processes through which method biases influence responses to measures, evaluate the many different procedural and statistical techniques that can be used to control method biases, and provide recommendations for how to select appropriate procedural and statistical remedies for different types of research settings.
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            International physical activity questionnaire: 12-country reliability and validity.

            Physical inactivity is a global concern, but diverse physical activity measures in use prevent international comparisons. The International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) was developed as an instrument for cross-national monitoring of physical activity and inactivity. Between 1997 and 1998, an International Consensus Group developed four long and four short forms of the IPAQ instruments (administered by telephone interview or self-administration, with two alternate reference periods, either the "last 7 d" or a "usual week" of recalled physical activity). During 2000, 14 centers from 12 countries collected reliability and/or validity data on at least two of the eight IPAQ instruments. Test-retest repeatability was assessed within the same week. Concurrent (inter-method) validity was assessed at the same administration, and criterion IPAQ validity was assessed against the CSA (now MTI) accelerometer. Spearman's correlation coefficients are reported, based on the total reported physical activity. Overall, the IPAQ questionnaires produced repeatable data (Spearman's rho clustered around 0.8), with comparable data from short and long forms. Criterion validity had a median rho of about 0.30, which was comparable to most other self-report validation studies. The "usual week" and "last 7 d" reference periods performed similarly, and the reliability of telephone administration was similar to the self-administered mode. The IPAQ instruments have acceptable measurement properties, at least as good as other established self-reports. Considering the diverse samples in this study, IPAQ has reasonable measurement properties for monitoring population levels of physical activity among 18- to 65-yr-old adults in diverse settings. The short IPAQ form "last 7 d recall" is recommended for national monitoring and the long form for research requiring more detailed assessment.
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              Self-reported and measured sleep duration: how similar are they?

              Recent epidemiologic studies have found that self-reported duration of sleep is associated with obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and mortality. The extent to which self reports of sleep duration are similar to objective measures and whether individual characteristics influence the degree of similarity are not known. Eligible participants at the Chicago site of the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study were invited to participate in a 2003-2005 ancillary sleep study; 82% (n = 669) agreed. Sleep measurements collected in 2 waves included 3 days each of wrist actigraphy, a sleep log, and questions about usual sleep duration. We estimate the average difference and correlation between subjectively and objectively measured sleep by using errors-in-variables regression models. Average measured sleep was 6 hours, whereas the average from subjective reports was 6.8 hours. Subjective reports increased on average by 34 minutes for each additional hour of measured sleep. Overall, the correlation between reported and measured sleep duration was 0.47. Our model suggests that persons sleeping 5 hours over-reported their sleep duration by 1.2 hours, and those sleeping 7 hours over-reported by 0.4 hours. The correlations and average differences between self-reports and measured sleep varied by health, sociodemographic, and sleep characteristics. In a population-based sample of middle-aged adults, subjective reports of habitual sleep are moderately correlated with actigraph-measured sleep, but are biased by systematic over-reporting. The true associations between sleep duration and health may differ from previously reported associations between self-reported sleep and health.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                EJOP
                Eur J Psychol
                Europe's Journal of Psychology
                Eur. J. Psychol.
                PsychOpen
                1841-0413
                30 November 2018
                2018
                : 14
                : 4
                : 880-896
                Affiliations
                [a ]Department of Health, Exercise Science and Recreation Management, Physical Activity Epidemiology Laboratory, Exercise Psychology Laboratory, The University of Mississippi , Oxford, MS, USA
                [b ]Behavioral Medicine Laboratory, School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education, The University of Victoria , Victoria, BC, Canada
                [3]Department of Psychology, Webster University Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland
                Author notes
                [* ]The University of Mississippi, Department of Health, Exercise Science and Recreation Management, Physical Activity Epidemiology Laboratory, Exercise Psychology Laboratory, 215 Turner Center, University, MS 38677. Phone: 662-915-5561; Fax: 662-915-5525. pdloprin@ 123456olemiss.edu
                Article
                ejop.v14i4.1450
                10.5964/ejop.v14i4.1450
                6266523
                0ee4905c-4005-497c-b3c2-2e8f106c3904

                This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) 3.0 License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

                History
                : 29 April 2017
                : 13 July 2018
                Product
                Self URI (journal-page): https://journals.psychopen.eu/
                Categories
                Research Reports

                Psychology
                sleep,psychology,diet,epidemiology,alcohol,exercise,smoking
                Psychology
                sleep, psychology, diet, epidemiology, alcohol, exercise, smoking

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