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      Mindful Self-Care and Secondary Traumatic Stress Mediate a Relationship Between Compassion Satisfaction and Burnout Risk Among Hospice Care Professionals

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      American Journal of Hospice and Palliative Medicine®
      SAGE Publications

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          A middle-range theory of self-care of chronic illness.

          Nearly 50% of adults have one or more chronic illnesses. Self-care is considered essential in the management of chronic illness, but the elements of self-care in this context have not been specified in a middle-range theory. This article describes a middle-range theory of self-care that addresses the process of maintaining health with health promoting practices within the context of the management required of a chronic illness. The key concepts include self-care maintenance, self-care monitoring, and self-care management. Assumptions and propositions of the theory are specified. Factors influencing self-care including experience, skill, motivation, culture, confidence, habits, function, cognition, support from others, and access to care are described.
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            Understanding Compassion Satisfaction, Compassion Fatigue and Burnout: a survey of the hospice palliative care workforce.

            Despite the increasingly crucial role of the healthcare workforce and volunteers working in hospice and palliative care (HPC), very little is known about factors that promote or limit the positive outcomes associated with practicing compassion.
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              A Study of the Relationship Between Self-Care, Compassion Satisfaction, Compassion Fatigue, and Burnout Among Hospice Professionals

              Hospice care professionals (HCPs) experience a large number of stressors in their work settings. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between self-care, compassion fatigue, burnout, and compassion satisfaction among HCPs. Thirty-seven HCPs were surveyed regarding their levels of compassion satisfaction, compassion fatigue, and burnout. Respondents also reported the types of self-care activities in which they took part. Results indicated a relationship between self-care strategies and lower levels of burnout and compassion fatigue, and higher levels of compassion satisfaction. Several suggestions are offered for continued research and practice in the hospice care field.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                American Journal of Hospice and Palliative Medicine®
                Am J Hosp Palliat Care
                SAGE Publications
                1049-9091
                1938-2715
                December 25 2017
                August 2018
                February 26 2018
                August 2018
                : 35
                : 8
                : 1099-1108
                Affiliations
                [1 ]VITAS Healthcare, Walnut Creek, CA, USA; Cornerstone University, Grand Rapids, MI, USA
                Article
                10.1177/1049909118756657
                29482332
                0f0efa63-a24e-4522-a25d-94bf1a217400
                © 2018

                http://journals.sagepub.com/page/policies/text-and-data-mining-license

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