5
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Eradication of vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus on a mouse model of third-degree burn infection by melittin: An antimicrobial peptide from bee venom

      , , ,
      Toxicon
      Elsevier BV

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references85

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Antimicrobial peptides of multicellular organisms.

          Multicellular organisms live, by and large, harmoniously with microbes. The cornea of the eye of an animal is almost always free of signs of infection. The insect flourishes without lymphocytes or antibodies. A plant seed germinates successfully in the midst of soil microbes. How is this accomplished? Both animals and plants possess potent, broad-spectrum antimicrobial peptides, which they use to fend off a wide range of microbes, including bacteria, fungi, viruses and protozoa. What sorts of molecules are they? How are they employed by animals in their defence? As our need for new antibiotics becomes more pressing, could we design anti-infective drugs based on the design principles these molecules teach us?
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Burn wound infections.

            Burns are one of the most common and devastating forms of trauma. Patients with serious thermal injury require immediate specialized care in order to minimize morbidity and mortality. Significant thermal injuries induce a state of immunosuppression that predisposes burn patients to infectious complications. A current summary of the classifications of burn wound infections, including their diagnosis, treatment, and prevention, is given. Early excision of the eschar has substantially decreased the incidence of invasive burn wound infection and secondary sepsis, but most deaths in severely burn-injured patients are still due to burn wound sepsis or complications due to inhalation injury. Burn patients are also at risk for developing sepsis secondary to pneumonia, catheter-related infections, and suppurative thrombophlebitis. The introduction of silver-impregnated devices (e.g., central lines and Foley urinary catheters) may reduce the incidence of nosocomial infections due to prolonged placement of these devices. Improved outcomes for severely burned patients have been attributed to medical advances in fluid resuscitation, nutritional support, pulmonary and burn wound care, and infection control practices.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Genetic analysis of a high-level vancomycin-resistant isolate of Staphylococcus aureus.

              Vancomycin is usually reserved for treatment of serious infections, including those caused by multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. A clinical isolate of S. aureus with high-level resistance to vancomycin (minimal inhibitory concentration = 1024 microg/ml) was isolated in June 2002. This isolate harbored a 57.9-kilobase multiresistance conjugative plasmid within which Tn1546 (vanA) was integrated. Additional elements on the plasmid encoded resistance to trimethoprim (dfrA), beta-lactams (blaZ), aminoglycosides (aacA-aphD), and disinfectants (qacC). Genetic analyses suggest that the long-anticipated transfer of vancomycin resistance to a methicillin-resistant S. aureus occurred in vivo by interspecies transfer of Tn1546 from a co-isolate of Enterococcus faecalis.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                (View ORCID Profile)
                (View ORCID Profile)
                Journal
                Toxicon
                Toxicon
                Elsevier BV
                00410101
                August 2021
                August 2021
                : 199
                : 49-59
                Article
                10.1016/j.toxicon.2021.05.015
                34087287
                0f20b0f5-4556-4bf6-8f83-a7f991ea3712
                © 2021

                https://www.elsevier.com/tdm/userlicense/1.0/

                http://www.elsevier.com/open-access/userlicense/1.0/

                History

                Comments

                Comment on this article