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      Integration of objects and space in perception and memory

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      Nature Neuroscience
      Springer Nature

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          Abstract

          <p class="first" id="P1">Distinct processing of objects and space has been an organizing principle for studying higher-level vision and medial temporal lobe memory. Here, however, we discuss how object and spatial information are in fact closely integrated in vision and memory. The ventral, object-processing visual pathway carries precise spatial information, transformed from retinotopic coordinates into relative dimensions. At the final stages of the ventral pathway (including area TEd), object-sensitive neurons are intermixed with neurons that process large-scale environmental space. TEd projects primarily to perirhinal cortex (PRC), which in turn projects to lateral entorhinal cortex (LEC). PRC and LEC also combine object and spatial information. For example, PRC and LEC neurons exhibit place fields that are evoked by landmark objects or the remembered locations of objects. Thus, spatial information, on both local and global scales, is deeply integrated into the ventral/temporal object-processing pathway in vision and memory. </p>

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          Most cited references116

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          Microstructure of a spatial map in the entorhinal cortex.

          The ability to find one's way depends on neural algorithms that integrate information about place, distance and direction, but the implementation of these operations in cortical microcircuits is poorly understood. Here we show that the dorsocaudal medial entorhinal cortex (dMEC) contains a directionally oriented, topographically organized neural map of the spatial environment. Its key unit is the 'grid cell', which is activated whenever the animal's position coincides with any vertex of a regular grid of equilateral triangles spanning the surface of the environment. Grids of neighbouring cells share a common orientation and spacing, but their vertex locations (their phases) differ. The spacing and size of individual fields increase from dorsal to ventral dMEC. The map is anchored to external landmarks, but persists in their absence, suggesting that grid cells may be part of a generalized, path-integration-based map of the spatial environment.
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            Loss of recent memory after bilateral hippocampal lesions.

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              Receptive fields of single neurones in the cat's striate cortex

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Nature Neuroscience
                Nat Neurosci
                Springer Nature
                1097-6256
                1546-1726
                October 26 2017
                October 26 2017
                : 20
                : 11
                : 1493-1503
                Article
                10.1038/nn.4657
                5920781
                29073645
                0fb0dc7d-261b-41cf-aa9e-b09f576963ee
                © 2017
                Product
                Self URI (article page): http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/nn.4657

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