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      Association Between Sleep Parameters and Glaucoma in the United States Population : National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

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          Most cited references 44

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          Self-reported and measured sleep duration: how similar are they?

          Recent epidemiologic studies have found that self-reported duration of sleep is associated with obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and mortality. The extent to which self reports of sleep duration are similar to objective measures and whether individual characteristics influence the degree of similarity are not known. Eligible participants at the Chicago site of the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study were invited to participate in a 2003-2005 ancillary sleep study; 82% (n = 669) agreed. Sleep measurements collected in 2 waves included 3 days each of wrist actigraphy, a sleep log, and questions about usual sleep duration. We estimate the average difference and correlation between subjectively and objectively measured sleep by using errors-in-variables regression models. Average measured sleep was 6 hours, whereas the average from subjective reports was 6.8 hours. Subjective reports increased on average by 34 minutes for each additional hour of measured sleep. Overall, the correlation between reported and measured sleep duration was 0.47. Our model suggests that persons sleeping 5 hours over-reported their sleep duration by 1.2 hours, and those sleeping 7 hours over-reported by 0.4 hours. The correlations and average differences between self-reports and measured sleep varied by health, sociodemographic, and sleep characteristics. In a population-based sample of middle-aged adults, subjective reports of habitual sleep are moderately correlated with actigraph-measured sleep, but are biased by systematic over-reporting. The true associations between sleep duration and health may differ from previously reported associations between self-reported sleep and health.
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            Quantitative criteria for insomnia.

            Formal diagnostic systems (DSM-IV, ICSD, and ICD-10) do not provide adequate quantitative criteria to diagnose insomnia. This may not present a serious problem in clinical settings where extensive interviews determine the need for clinical management. However, lack of standard criteria introduce disruptive variability into the insomnia research domain. The present study reviewed two decades of psychology clinical trials for insomnia to determine common practice with regard to frequency, severity, and duration criteria for insomnia. Modal patterns established frequency (> or =3 nights a week) and duration (> or =6 months) standard criteria. We then applied four versions of severity criteria to a random sample and used sensitivity-specificity analyses to identify the most valid criterion. We found that severity of sleep onset latency or wake time after sleep onset of: (a) > or =31 min; (b) occurring > or =3 nights a week; (c) for > or =6 months are the most defensible quantitative criteria for insomnia.
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              Glaucoma and disability: which tasks are affected, and at what stage of disease?

              To summarize recent work from clinical and epidemiological studies that describe how, and at what stage, glaucoma affects the performance of important vision-related activities. Difficulties with the extremes of lighting are the most frequent complaint in glaucoma. Individuals with bilateral glaucoma also self-report difficulty with a broad array of tasks, including reading, walking, and driving. Bilateral glaucoma is associated with driving cessation and limitation, bumping into objects, slower walking, and falls. Some, but not all, studies also demonstrate higher accident rates in glaucoma. Measurable effects on reading speed have only been observed with field damage severe enough to affect binocular central acuity. Glaucoma with bilateral visual field loss is associated with increased symptoms and a measurable decline in mobility and driving. Further work is necessary to establish whether unilateral glaucoma has a significant impact on patients, to determine whether reading difficulty is common in patients with bilateral glaucoma, and to establish the effects of lighting conditions on task performance in glaucoma.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Glaucoma
                Journal of Glaucoma
                Ovid Technologies (Wolters Kluwer Health)
                1057-0829
                2019
                February 2019
                : 28
                : 2
                : 97-104
                Article
                10.1097/IJG.0000000000001169
                © 2019

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