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      Women in natural disasters: A case study from southern coastal region of Bangladesh

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      International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction
      Elsevier BV

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          Most cited references14

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          Climate change and disaster management.

          Climate change, although a natural phenomenon, is accelerated by human activities. Disaster policy response to climate change is dependent on a number of factors, such as readiness to accept the reality of climate change, institutions and capacity, as well as willingness to embed climate change risk assessment and management in development strategies. These conditions do not yet exist universally. A focus that neglects to enhance capacity-building and resilience as a prerequisite for managing climate change risks will, in all likelihood, do little to reduce vulnerability to those risks. Reducing vulnerability is a key aspect of reducing climate change risk. To do so requires a new approach to climate change risk and a change in institutional structures and relationships. A focus on development that neglects to enhance governance and resilience as a prerequisite for managing climate change risks will, in all likelihood, do little to reduce vulnerability to those risks.
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            Why relatively fewer people died? The case of Bangladesh’s Cyclone Sidr

            Bimal Paul (2009)
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              The bangladesh cyclone of 1991: why so many people died.

              Living with natural disasters has become a way of life in Bangladesh. On the night of 29 April 1991 a severe cyclonic storm, accompanied by tidal surges up to 30 feet high, battered the coastal areas of Bangladesh for 3-4 hours. Thousands of people were killed and property worth billions of dollars was destroyed. After the cyclone, several studies, using epidemiological and anthropological methods, looked at the impact of the cyclone. It was estimated that over 67,000 people lost their lives. Women, children and the elderly were much more at risk and so were those from the socio-economically disadvantaged section of the population. Cyclone shelters were few in relation to need but proved very helpful in saving lives. At least 20 per cent more deaths would have occurred in the absence of these shelters. The article documents impressive improvements in Bangladesh's-ability to cope and makes recommendations for the future.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction
                International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction
                Elsevier BV
                22124209
                June 2014
                June 2014
                : 8
                :
                : 68-82
                Article
                10.1016/j.ijdrr.2014.01.003
                0fed6103-2e59-42a7-9f24-aa1a26624378
                © 2014
                History

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