1
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Visible-Light-Driven Photocatalysts for Self-Cleaning Transparent Surfaces

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          <p xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" class="first" id="d3995301e127">Highly transparent photocatalytic self-cleaning surfaces capable of harvesting near-visible (365-430 nm) photons were synthesized and characterized. This helps to address a current research gap in self-cleaning surfaces, in which photocatalytic coatings that exhibit activity at wavelengths longer than ultraviolet (UV) generally have poor optical transparency, because of broadband scattering and the attenuation of visible light. In this work, the wavelength-dependent photocatalytic activity of Pt-modified TiO2 (Pt-TiO2) particles was characterized, which exhibited activity for wavelengths up to 430 nm. Pt-TiO2 nanoparticles were embedded in a mesoporous SiO2 sol-gel matrix, forming a superhydrophilic surface that allowed for water adsorption and formation of reactive oxide species upon illumination, resulting in the removal of organic surface contaminants. These self-cleaning surfaces only interact strongly with near-visible light (∼365-430 nm), as characterized by photocatalytic self-cleaning tests. Broadband visible transparency was preserved by generating a morphology composed of small clusters of Pt-TiO2 surrounded by a matrix of SiO2, which limited diffuse visible light scattering and attenuation. The wavelength-dependent self-cleaning rate by the films was quantified using stearic acid degradation under both monochromatic and AM1.5G spectral illumination. By varying the film morphology, the average transmittance relative to bare glass can be tuned from ∼93%-99%, and the self-cleaning rate can be adjusted by more than an order of magnitude. Overall, the ability to utilize photocatalysts with tunable visible light activity, while maintaining broadband transparency, can enable the use of photocatalytic self-cleaning surfaces for applications where UV illumination is limited, such as touchscreen displays. </p>

          Related collections

          Author and article information

          Contributors
          Journal
          Langmuir
          Langmuir
          American Chemical Society (ACS)
          0743-7463
          1520-5827
          September 27 2022
          September 12 2022
          September 27 2022
          : 38
          : 38
          : 11641-11649
          Affiliations
          [1 ]Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, United States
          [2 ]Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, United States
          [3 ]Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, United States
          [4 ]General Motors Technical Center, Warren, Michigan 48093, United States
          Article
          10.1021/acs.langmuir.2c01455
          36095297
          0fef1dbc-b236-45ad-a67e-8041b6cf4540
          © 2022

          https://doi.org/10.15223/policy-029

          https://doi.org/10.15223/policy-037

          https://doi.org/10.15223/policy-045

          History

          Comments

          Comment on this article