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      Antarctic dry valleys: Microclimate zonation, variable geomorphic processes, and implications for assessing climate change on Mars

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      Icarus

      Elsevier BV

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          Most cited references 154

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          Global mineralogical and aqueous mars history derived from OMEGA/Mars Express data.

          Global mineralogical mapping of Mars by the Observatoire pour la Mineralogie, l'Eau, les Glaces et l'Activité (OMEGA) instrument on the European Space Agency's Mars Express spacecraft provides new information on Mars' geological and climatic history. Phyllosilicates formed by aqueous alteration very early in the planet's history (the "phyllocian" era) are found in the oldest terrains; sulfates were formed in a second era (the "theiikian" era) in an acidic environment. Beginning about 3.5 billion years ago, the last era (the "siderikian") is dominated by the formation of anhydrous ferric oxides in a slow superficial weathering, without liquid water playing a major role across the planet.
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            Evidence for recent groundwater seepage and surface runoff on Mars.

            Relatively young landforms on Mars, seen in high-resolution images acquired by the Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter Camera since March 1999, suggest the presence of sources of liquid water at shallow depths beneath the martian surface. Found at middle and high martian latitudes (particularly in the southern hemisphere), gullies within the walls of a very small number of impact craters, south polar pits, and two of the larger martian valleys display geomorphic features that can be explained by processes associated with groundwater seepage and surface runoff. The relative youth of the landforms is indicated by the superposition of the gullies on otherwise geologically young surfaces and by the absence of superimposed landforms or cross-cutting features, including impact craters, small polygons, and eolian dunes. The limited size and geographic distribution of the features argue for constrained source reservoirs.
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              Improved general circulation models of the Martian atmosphere from the surface to above 80 km

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Icarus
                Icarus
                Elsevier BV
                00191035
                December 2007
                December 2007
                : 192
                : 1
                : 187-222
                Article
                10.1016/j.icarus.2007.06.018
                101b514b-a7d3-4bea-a174-31e7d591d000
                © 2007

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