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      Genetic deficiency of chemokine receptor CCR5 is a strong risk factor for symptomatic West Nile virus infection: a meta-analysis of 4 cohorts in the US epidemic.

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          Abstract

          West Nile virus (WNV) causes disease in approximately 20% of infected humans. We previously reported that homozygosity for CCR5Delta32, a nonfunctional variant of chemokine receptor CCR5, is markedly increased among symptomatic WNV-seropositive patients from Arizona and Colorado. To confirm this, we analyzed cohorts from California and Illinois. An increase in CCR5-deficient subjects was found in both (for California, odds ratio [OR], 4.2 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.5-11.9] [P= .004]; for Illinois, OR, 3.1 [95% CI, 0.9-11.2] [P= .06]). A meta-analysis of all 4 cohorts showed an OR of 4.2 (95% CI, 2.1-8.3 [P= .0001]). Thus, CCR5 deficiency is a strong and consistent risk factor for symptomatic WNV infection in the United States.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          J Infect Dis
          The Journal of infectious diseases
          University of Chicago Press
          0022-1899
          0022-1899
          Jan 15 2008
          : 197
          : 2
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Molecular Signaling Section, Laboratory of Molecular Immunology, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA.
          Article
          10.1086/524691
          18179388
          10228e12-2d06-4f69-a072-215298da298c
          History

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