2
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Intravenous dexmedetomidine for the treatment of shivering during Cesarean delivery under neuraxial anesthesia: a randomized-controlled trial Translated title: Administration de dexmédétomidine intraveineuse pour le traitement des frissons pendant un accouchement par césarienne sous anesthésie neuraxiale : une étude randomisée contrôlée

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references30

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Dexmedetomidine does not alter the sweating threshold, but comparably and linearly decreases the vasoconstriction and shivering thresholds.

          Clonidine decreases the vasoconstriction and shivering thresholds. It thus seems likely that the alpha2 agonist dexmedetomidine will also impair control of body temperature. Accordingly, the authors evaluated the dose-dependent effects of dexmedetomidine on the sweating, vasoconstriction, and shivering thresholds. They also measured the effects of dexmedetomidine on heart rate, blood pressures, and plasma catecholamine concentrations. Nine male volunteers participated in this randomized, double-blind, cross-over protocol. The study drug was administered by computer-controlled infusion, targeting plasma dexmedetomidine concentrations of 0.0, 0.3, and 0.6 ng/ml. Each day, skin and core temperatures were increased to provoke sweating and then subsequently reduced to elicit vasoconstriction and shivering. Core-temperature thresholds were computed using established linear cutaneous contributions to control of sweating, vasoconstriction, and shivering. The dose-dependent effects of dexmedetomidine on thermoregulatory response thresholds were then determined using linear regression. Heart rate, arterial blood pressures, and plasma catecholamine concentrations were determined at baseline and at each threshold. Neither dexmedetomidine concentration increased the sweating threshold from control values. In contrast, dexmedetomidine administration reduced the vasoconstriction threshold by 1.61 +/- 0.80 degrees C x ng(-1) x ml (mean +/- SD) and the shivering threshold by 2.40 +/- 0.90 degrees C x ng(-1) x ml. Hemodynamic responses and catecholamine concentrations were reduced from baseline values, but they did not differ at the two tested dexmedetomidine doses. Dexmedetomidine markedly increased the range of temperatures not triggering thermoregulatory defenses. The drug is thus likely to promote hypothermia in a typical hospital environment; it is also likely to prove an effective treatment for shivering.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            A comparison of tramadol, amitriptyline, and meperidine for postepidural anesthetic shivering in parturients.

            Tramadol is effective for treating shivering during epidural anesthesia in parturients. In addition to its low affinity to opioid receptors, tramadol exerts a modulatory effect on central monoaminergic pathways. In this respect, there are parallels between the mechanisms of the action of tramadol and antidepressants such as amitriptyline. Meperidine is often recommended for the treatment of postanesthetic shivering. This prospective, double-blinded, and randomized clinical study was performed to compare the antishivering effects and accompanying side effects among tramadol, meperidine, and amitriptyline for the treatment of postepidural anesthetic shivering. Forty-five parturients who shivered during cesarean delivery under epidural anesthesia and requested antishivering treatment were randomly allocated to one of three groups for IV treatment: Group T (n = 15) received tramadol 0.5 mg/kg, Group M (n = 15) received meperidine 0.5 mg/kg, and Group A (n = 15) received amitriptyline 15 or 20 mg. The response rate (shivering ceased after treatment in 15 min) was 87% and 93% for Groups T and M, respectively, compared with 13% in Group A (P < 0.01). The time that elapsed from treatment to the time shivering ceased was 5.1 +/- 3.6 min (mean +/- SD) for Group T and 4.2 +/- 2.3 min for Group M. There was a significantly more frequent incidence (33%) of somnolence in Group M when compared with Groups T (7%) and A (0%) (P < 0.01). However, no significant differences were shown for pruritus, nausea, vomiting, or Apgar scores of newborns. We concluded that both tramadol and meperidine show a significantly faster response rate in the treatment of postepidural anesthetic shivering when compared with amitriptyline in the dosage used; tramadol had a decreased incidence of somnolence when compared with meperidine. This study was performed to compare the antishivering and side effects among tramadol, amitriptyline, and meperidine for the treatment of postepidural anesthetic shivering in parturients. Both tramadol and meperidine show a significantly faster response rate in the treatment of shivering when compared with amitriptyline. Tramadol had a less frequent incidence of somnolence than meperidine.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              A phase II/III, multicenter, safety, efficacy, and pharmacokinetic study of dexmedetomidine in preterm and term neonates.

              To investigate the safety, efficacy, and pharmacokinetic profile of dexmedetomidine in preterm and full-term neonates ≥ 28 to ≤ 44 weeks gestational age.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Canadian Journal of Anesthesia/Journal canadien d'anesthésie
                Can J Anesth/J Can Anesth
                Springer Science and Business Media LLC
                0832-610X
                1496-8975
                July 2019
                April 3 2019
                July 2019
                : 66
                : 7
                : 762-771
                Article
                10.1007/s12630-019-01354-3
                103384c0-7aa6-4d68-a7bc-e37100d7d8ec
                © 2019

                Comments

                Comment on this article